Pre-revolutionary England

The Scouring of the Shire.

That “Tommy Tommy Tommy Robinson” song the English protesters are chanting is catchy. A revolutionary song. Then the crowd chants thunderously “Shame on you!” at the police. It’s going to be a source of shame, and possibly fear, to be an English policeman.

I saw this in Poland when Communism was on its last legs (Though it didn’t feel that way at the time. People continued to be afraid of the secret police).

The “villain-face” of that regime was its subservience to the USSR, the economic austerity, and the aggressive black-out about Katyń Massacre. The “villain-face” of UK’s current regime is the paki-pedo alliance, anarcho-tyranny, and population replacement.

I’ve been saying this since at least 2009: soon, people will stop believing in neoliberalism and its subsidiary anti-racist ideologies. And after that, people will stop pretending to believe.

See London cops run like rabbits when “Free Tommy” protesters chase them down.

Advertisements

Is There Anything More Rope-Ready Than An English Judge?

Tommy Robinson is an English patriot who was jailed last Friday after he filmed members of a Pakistani child-exploitation gang entering a court for trial. You could say that in reporting facts about the brown-skinned human garbage and the English girls they traffic under the protection of England’s authorities, he is doing what journalists ought to be doing but aren’t. Robinson’s supporters are protesting his arrest:

Impulsively, I first titled a draft of this post “Is There Anything More Loathsome Than An English Policeman.” On reflection, I reconsidered. Policemen play the role of a dumb animal that does what it’s ordered to do. If you are a wage-earner, that describes you as well, so let’s not feel superior. If I’m going to hate all cops, I should also hate all school teachers and all government contractors, all of whom follow the same orders.

Suburban_elk addresses the state’s extralegal practice of death-by-muzz, that’s on everyone’s mind in the matter of Tommy Robinson:

Many commenters say it’s a “death sentence” but in my opinion even the stupid politicos in UK must know, that he needs protected, and that they themselves will be better off providing him reasonable in-house security.

On the US side, there is a similar problem of incarceration. If Whites were not a persecuted ethnic group, there would be a legitimate defense against incarceration on the constitutional grounds of not being subject to cruel and unusual punishment, which is what it is with race conflict.

Robinson might be too prominent a figure to execute, but I wouldn’t put it past U.K.’s degenerate political system to sacrifice him. Hubris is the mark of wobbling regimes. After all, they’ve gotten away with that before. Everybody here knows about the 35-year-old Kevin Crehan who was given a one-year sentence for leaving bacon sandwiches outside of a mosque in England and murdered by Muslim inmates:

Man jailed for leaving a bacon sandwich outside a mosque is found dead in prison halfway through his 12-month sentence … A St George flag with the words ‘no mosques’ was also tied to the fence outside the building in Totterdown, Bristol, and shouted racial abuse at a worshipper.

Bacon was tied to the door handles and sandwiches made of raw meat and sliced white bread were left at the entrance, in what was described in court by the judge as an ‘an attack on England‘.

The cockroach-judge will be dealt with after this is all over. Unlike a cop, he had the freedom to do the right thing without jeopardizing his livelihood.

Nationalist demonstrations in England and all over Western Europe are Type 3 protests by citizens who timidly, at first, take to the streets to defy the legitimacy of a government whose demonstrable purpose is the carrying out of White Genocide. Regarding the English political class, MGE sums things up:

Yeah it reeks of desperation.
We’ve got them cornered.
DOTR can’t come soon enough

Idle Thoughts On Songs About Home

Home, home again, I like to be here when I can
And when I come home cold and tired
Its good to warm my bones beside the fire
— Pink Floyd

Culture may even be described simply as that which makes life worth living.
— T.S. Eliot

Homer’s “Odyssey” is about man’s struggle against temptation, monsters, and gods in his quest for home. As the foundational poem tells it, you can go home again, provided that you rid it of squatters. Modern songs, no less, express that love for home, either the satisfaction of having found it or the realization that you truly know what you have only after you lose it.

I compiled a few songs that carry that spirit, omitting ones with the word “home” in their title.

Madness “Our House.” Home and hearth figures prominently in English art. It’s no surprise that the now-universal metaphor for home, the Hobbits’ Shire, came from that land.

Our house it has a crowd
There’s always something happening
And it’s usually quite loud
Our mum she’s so house-proud
Nothing ever slows her down and a mess is not allowed

The Head and the Heart “Down in the Valley.” This indie folk band shares the road-weariness of touring, and how all the tedium and grind are worth the moment it all comes together at show time.

I know there’s California, Oklahoma
And all of the places I ain’t ever been to but
Down in the valley with whiskey rivers
These are the places you will find me hidin’
These are the places I will always go
These are the places I will always go

Bonus — check out their song “Shake.” Trust + chemistry = friendship. That’s home too. The melody and the video: pure joy.

Dream Academy “Life in a Northern Town.” The song was written as an elegy to a young musician who had died ten years earlier. Its snapshots of a northern English town, filmed for the video in 1985, evoke a cloudy place that as an ice-age European, I find homelike.

NorthernTown2

A northern town

Jason Isbell “Travelling Alone.” Home is where the heart is, as every vagabond knows. Isbell sings about the ultimate state of homelessness, being alone:

Damn near strangled by my appetite
Ybor City on a Friday night
Couldn’t even stand up right

So high the street girls wouldn’t take my pay
They said come see me on a better day
She just danced away

Morrissey “Every Day is like Sunday.” Many of the songs on this list are from England. There is something that cries for rivers of blood about the English people’s ancient love of home, so chronicled in their folklore, contrasted with the present diversity nightmare. The lyrics paint a survivor’s longing for death in a post-apocalyptic landscape that was once a sunny place. The opening vocals in “Sunday” are possibly my favorite of any song.

Trudging slowly over wet sand
Back to the bench where your clothes were stolen
This is the coastal town
That they forgot to close down
Armageddon, come Armageddon!
Come, Armageddon! Come

The Tuttles and AJ Lee covering “Hickory Wind.” Your life’s arc might lead you to “the riches and pleasures.” But should it all dissolve to lonesomeness, your thoughts will turn homeward:

In South Carolina there are many tall pines
I remember the oak tree that we used to climb
But it makes me feel better each time it begins
Callin’ me home hickory wind

Lonestar “Already There.” This song was heavily played during the height of U.S. troop deployment to Iraq, obviously meaningful to those who were missing their loved ones:

A little voice came on the phone
Said, “Daddy when you coming home?”

Maybe it’s just my interpretation, but those lines, beginning with “I’m already there,” read like the words of a fallen soldier who had finally come Home:

He said the first thing that came to his mind
I’m already there
Take a look around
I’m the sunshine in your hair
I’m the shadow on the ground
I’m the whisper in the wind
I’m your imaginary friend
And I know I’m in your prayers
Oh, I’m already there

Waylon Jennings “Luckenbach, Texas.” There is at least one industry compilation that ranks it as the all-time greatest Country song. It is about having drifted from home, as can happen between two people…

I don’t need my name in the marquee lights
I got my song and I got you with me tonight
Maybe it’s time we got back to the basics of love

… and in the bigger picture, as the song is a call for Country musicians to reclaim their roots:

Let’s go to Luckenbach, Texas
With Waylon and Willie and the boys
This successful life we’re livin’
Got us feuding like the Hatfields and McCoys

Guns N’ Roses “November Rain.” This epic ballad ranks among Rock’s top-five all time greatest songs, with “Light My Fire,” “Tuesday’s Gone, “Stairway to Heaven,” and “Black.” But there is something else that’s special about it. The song’s closing lyrics are a salutary reminder that there is daybreak:

So never mind the darkness
We still can find a way
‘Cause nothin’ lasts forever
Even cold November rain

Say No To Entropy

Speaking of bravery, Marvel comics is finding their sales waaaaay down after a recent dip into “diversity” waters. Could it be because blacks, Muslim women, etc. just aren’t that heroic? Would they storm the beach under fire at Normandy or brave their way back into the Twin Towers to look for the injured while the fire still raged? The black teens in Florida last week didn’t even lift a finger to call 911 while the mentally challenged black man flailed in the pond and died. — Camlost

The SJW delusion is that by taking over good real estate, they will keep harnessing its value to their purposes. They don’t understand that by ruining good real estate, they kill its original value.  The result: nobody watches the new Dr. Who. (This is similar to how when women take over a profession, its value in terms of social status and earning power collapses).

The Millennial Woes podcasts below is good, and is related to the above. It’s about the new female Dr. Who. He brings up the “reasonable” liberal argument: why not? After all, the show’s main character has no reason to not reincarnate as, say, a woman, or black, or Chinese. He follows with an aside remark that grabbed my attention: “That’s entropy.”

Yes, as I’ll add: the entropy-mentality of liberalism that would have everything in the world just amalgamate through Brownian motion. A reflection of the r-selected mentality: cows grazing, rabbits munching on grass. No agency, no control, no order, no will, no transcendence of mindless random forces of whatever breeze blows through.

So Millennial Woes eviscerates the liberal argument by first establishing that Dr. Who has traditionally been an icon for slightly-misfit boys, a character they related to growing up in ways that they wouldn’t relate to in his female form. He then suggests that the producers’ ultimate goal is to make him black, with a woman being a moderate step in that direction. The goal is to move on to James Bond, and ultimately to tar-brush (my term, not his) all iconic European characters.

He goes on to explain that Dr. Who’s fan-base tends to be liberal, so they struggle in formulating their objections to a female character. They make content-free points such as: “I like the move toward diversity but they are doing it for political reasons, they are going about it all wrong” — like what does that even mean? How would going about it “the right way” look?

So finally, Millennial Woes masterfully delivers the identitarian argument we are all familiar with here: Dr. Who is an English cultural icon, he has always been British (there was one or two Scottish actors) — and that is the reason to keep him a British man — and yes, that also means White.

And as I would add, make a K-selected stand: he is ours, you can’t have him. Say No to entropy.

Good podcast; there is a lot more there:

“Her Microphone Is Bigger Than Her Brain”

“The terrorist att… — er, the incident” — BBC reporterette

“This is the narrative that the liberal media give you. It’s liberalism. You are saturated with political correctness. Your brains have been eaten away by the bacteria of Cultural Marxism. What is it — I’ve told you before — it’s German Jews who told you that you have to be politically correct, that you have to take in ethnic minorities, and he who doesn’t is a nationalist, fascist, and needs to be terminated. And so now you have a Muslim mayor of London who says bromides, you have Miss Theresa May who drones on with empty phrases because she is afraid to say anything more aggressive, something that would give a measure of comfort and peace to her people.” — Max Kolonko (in translation)

Mariusz Max Kolonko is a former senior White House correspondent for TVP and now a popular New York-based political commentator on his news show. In the latest video he comments on last week’s London Bridge terror attacks.

The video below includes footage from the attack, following by his analysis, which is subtitled in English. Some points he makes:

  • A wry observation that none of the television reporters in London are White. He lays into some mystery-meat bimbo, giving me the title for this post.
  • A look at the defeated or mendacious tweets of various European leaders, along with liberal media’s dishonestly edited reporting on Donald Trump’s reaction to the attack. (Kolonko is a big fan of Trump and has provided outstanding commentary throughout the election campaign.)
  • A reminder that Europe is at war, and with the world’s best warriors.
  • Speaking to his audience in Poland, he says: “our mono-ethnicity is our strength” — despite others’ calling it the country’s “colossal failure.”

There is more; the heart of this commentary is that the only way forward is to arm the people, let them defend themselves, and to take what’s going on seriously because it’s war.

He calls on European leadership to implement as first step, a Trump-style travel ban, declare martial law, deport anyone associated with suspected terrorists — their family, and even people they were seen talking with.

And arm Europe’s native population. Unlike this ovine approach, as tweeted by London Metropolitan Police:

rht1

“This is their advice when you see something frightening — ‘run, hide, tell’ — how about instead, Ready, Aim, Fire?” — Kolonko  

People leave the area with their hands up after an incident near London Bridge in London

“When I saw those British people with their hands up, who marched down the street like sheep to a slaughterhouse… Maybe I’m living in a different world here in the United States. But I looked at them and I felt sorry for them. I said to myself, look: this is our Western Civilization. Those are our people, our brothers and sisters who are led like a surrendering population.” — Kolonko

He concludes with words of contempt addressed directly to Theresa May and a demand that, as a key step in dealing with the terror attacks and the larger dispossession that they are a symptom of, Europeans be rearmed. So, in his words, let’s make it a real fight: when a Muslim terrorist runs up, he will fall dead before he has a chance to shout “Allah.”

Imagine

Imagine there’s no mercy
It’s easy if you try
Traitors hang on lampposts
Above us righteous God

Imagine all the coloreds driven from our lands

Imagine there’s no leftism
It’s the easiest thing to do
A time to kill or die for
And separation too

Imagine our people free and true again

Hope burned in the hearts of dreamers
Who saw another way to live
So many have since joined us
The world is starting to believe

Imagine there’s a future
I wonder if you can
No need for nihilism
An awakening of man

Imagine Europeans’ glory yet untold

People said that I’m a dreamer
But I’m just a woken man
For a brotherhood of nations
And White children face the sun

***

UPDATE: The Mamas & The Pepes have set my take on Lennon’s “Imagine” to music. It’s fantastic:

***

race2

***

A few words on why John Lennon’s original is the most anti-human song ever written.

***

The 16 Points that describe the Alt-Right’s core philosophy.

***

Something about this man’s words (read them closely) and his face struck me as proof that we won’t be homeless forever:

A homeless [Manchester] man, called Steve, described the moment he had to ‘pull nails out of children’s faces’ following the shocking attack.

He said: ‘Just because I’m homeless it does not mean that I haven’t got a heart and I’m not human still.

‘They needed the help and I would like to think someone would come and help me if I needed help.

‘It’s your instinct to go and help and it was children and it was a lot of children. We were pulling nails out of their arms and from a little girl’s face.

‘It had to be done, you had to help. If I didn’t I wouldn’t be able to live with myself for walking away and leaving kids like that.’

englstev

(Story above). Source of top image unknown. Alternate lyrics to “Imagine” written by me.