Out with the 80s, in with the 90s

Someone said that the 2020s be the decade of 1990s nostalgia. Time to move on the from ’80s. Let’s go with that. Eighties music, described in one word: stylization. Nineties music: sincerity.

The greatest visual moment in a ’90s music video is in Temple of the Dog “Hunger Strike,” those guys jamming out on a Pacific northwest beach under an evening sky. But the most quintessential Nineties sound is Candlebox “Far Behind.” Play it and feel the vocals:

Open thread, of course.

121 thoughts on “Out with the 80s, in with the 90s

  1. Hunger Strike was/is a favorite tune of mine. Easy to sing since the lyrics are repeated.

    Strange decade for mainstream music: the end of the big hair rock bands; hardcore metal getting phased out as grunge took over; hell freezes over for the Eagles; the alternative scene splintering into various subgenres and styles; 80s rap turning into 90s rap turning into gangsta rap turning into hip hop; return of the boy bands and bumblegum pop gals; Garth Brooks taking country to new heights.

    The Rolling Stones and Aerosmith doing their thing as usual.

  2. Excellent synopsis. “the end of the big hair rock bands” — it was a spectacular finish though. GNR matured with their epic double album, lots of one-hit hairbands did excellent songs. Forgotten ones like “Fly High Michelle,” “Hot Cherie” by Hardline [look it up… mega memory to that song]; “High Enough,” “Ballad of Jayne.” Steelheart with “I’ll never let you go.” Their former lead singer is huge in Korea now, worth checking out some of his current work there. Metallica went mainstream. The much maligned Warrant and several others had a couple of good songs. I was in the audience of a wet t-shirt contest in FL in 1990 and remember “Cherry Pie” being boomed from the speakers.

    ” the alternative scene splintering into various subgenres and styles” — REM, which was college rock in the 80s, put out several great albums after 89’s Green. U2 went stratospheric with Achtung Baby.

    Mid90s saw the rise of next decade’s Green Day.

    The latter half of the 90s didn’t do much for me, but I liked some of the Ironic Rock bands like Barenaked Ladies.

  3. PS: the “crow” bands in the early 90s: Black Crowes and Counting Crows. You can call it “neo-Americana”. Authentic with regards to the former.

  4. I was just a tyke stealing my family’s rums. A tract I recently discovered was published in ’95: ‘The Baltic Origins of Homer’s Epic Tales’ (Felice Vinci). Has enormous/deep-seated implications, even if only half-true. Regulars here should appreciate Vinci’s thesis; read alongside high-caliber poetry from those shores.

    A few 90s acts I admired: Pixies, Tom Zé, Melos Quartet Stuttgart.

  5. Rancid, Social Distortion, and the Mighty Mighty Bosstones. Smashing Pumpkins, too. Pearl Jam certainly holds up to my older ears, but Nirvana has not aged so well. Cobain was a whining junkie and re-listening to his caterwauling today is excruciating. His wife’s band’s second album surprised me by holding up far better. Malibu and Celebrity Skin are still good.

    As for the Counting Crows, I had this on a lot last month… https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1D5PtyrewSs

  6. Pretty much, pickle.

    I spent a lot of the early 90s up and down the coast going to clubs that had underage admission shows. Mostly hardcore, grunge, and punk stuff. It was wild. I had much older friends who could drive and every weekend was a new show.

    I was playing Pearl Jam for my kids the other day. Other bands, too, I especially like early Chili Peppers. It’s edifying to hear your littles running around singing songs you love.

    Is that too Boomer for a Gen Xer?

    PA, somewhere around ‘98, id say, “Alt” went pop. Whether it was coopted and oversold or it was just an evolution in the culture, everything I loved became generic and formulated.

    You had these Number Bands, too. 311. Blink 182. All the same sound, the same way micromanaged hair bands all had a ballad. Same way country music has become a “sensation” among people who would never otherwise care.

  7. Faith No More “Epic”
    Mazzy Star “Fade Into You”
    4 Non Blondes “What’s Up”

    Songs I liked at first hearing.

    Also, agreed on Hole. “Violet” and “Doll Parts” are excellent.

    A recent story on Pearl Jam “Black.” I always liked that song, said many times that the outtro is the howl of the dispossessed White youth of that time. The PinkPop 1992 concert version is the best. As to recent perspective, we hosted this past New Year’s Eve party and one of my friends was streaming music into into the remote speaker. Another friend who had always hated Grunge because, as he put it, it was “whiny, mumbling, and faggoty,” conceded that when it came to the intensity of emotion and the guitars, “Black” was in fact pretty good.

    As to more upbeat songs of the early 90s: the B52s had some good songs on their album.

    — PA, somewhere around ‘98, id say, “Alt” went pop.

    The early 2000s decade was a post-Grunge holding pattern moment. Avril Lavigne “I’m With You” is one hundred percent stylistically 90s, The song is profound, imploring. Its very title speaks volumes. It’s the confusion of the post-9/11 world. And then other bands in the style of the 90s, but without their … grounding … in the moment. Examples: Foo Fighters early stuff, Fuel “Hemorrhage”, Switchfoot “Dare You to Move”

  8. I understand why some weird kids stay weird and almost fiercely protect their interests, maybe even get weirder for the sake of maintaining some kind of sacred aesthetic space.

    Field report, teenager edition: smart phones really are making kids dumber. News at 11. The slide into oblivion accelerates under the haze of a blue backlit glow.

  9. I gotta admit, I’m a sucker for that 4 Non Blondes song. Catchy tune and has a positive element to it. Takes me back to high school sophomore year.

    PA, regarding Black, Pearl Jam’s first live album (me thinks), Live On Two Legs, has one of the best live versions I’ve heard of the song. Once, in the early aughts, I asked my buddy to play that as a few of us blokes where heading out somewhere. Mind you, these blokes bought into the whole nog music scene but were open to the song. The song goes on and in the outro, as it were, the guitar solo just goes nuts. Great to listen to after some Jameson.

    Afterwards, one of my friends said that at one point, we were all in synch with our head bobbing.

    Years later, Pearl Jam released a number of their concerts on CD. I bought a couple or three. But that Live On Two Legs version can’t be beat.

    For late 90s, the two albums that I absolutely listened to all the way through and night and day were New Radicals only album and Semisonic’s album, the one with Closing Time. Hmm, now that I think about it, that song could reference the end of the decade, century and millennium.

  10. The Crowes were dick swingers for sure. They had like two hits. Or three if you count the one about drug addiction. Just today I heard one of them (one of “the Crows”) on the radio. He apparently has a syndicated [is that even the right word anymore] rock show that gets picked up by the major commercial stations. His get, his angle, is that he knows the genre super well, and also has the inside scoop on the business. They made a convincing sell of it (his show) but I have not listened.

    The interesting bit was his self intro, where he said, exactly — “This is Steve Gorman, of the rock-n-roll band, The Black Crowes [etc blah blah]”

    Which came across as a sort of goofy false modesty, as in: I don’t expect you know who the Black Crowes are; I am but a humble servant and host of the following program

    But the thing-of-note about the Crowes is that they were unapologetic rock-n-rollers, in a way that other contemporary bands failed. Being from the South, is the answer to that riddle. The Georgia Satellites were similar in that regard, with their 1.5 hits. For extra credit, what was their second and only, half-hit?

    It was the song about the Mississippi River “going downstream”

    Good lyrics, and again, a little bit overdone. But overdone was their charm.

  11. I was really tuned out, of Life and of Music, in the 90s. What was I listening to though…

    Oh yeah that’s right. My friends were all into the Dead, and that scene; whereas I couldn’t find the enthusiasm for it. Later though I came to admire their having passion for at least something resembling life!

    One of my best friends from growing up was a talented guy, and he went on to a career as a sound guy setting up live shows. He actually got the “kind bud” [which is in quotes because that’s what it was called, then and there] for the actual Grateful Dead, when they played his city, and where was doing the board. He may have been the guy. He was never a pathological liar and assume he was telling the truth.

    I lost touch with him, but was always impressed in how he managed to get in there, and develop the skillz and the working relationships with the necessary people, to get real gigs. However the corollary concern, is how good was he, really; and when did he peak?

    Is he ok, now? I have no idea. To put it in square boomer: he smoked a lot of drugs.

  12. — For extra credit, what was their second and only, half-hit?

    The one about punctuation. Awesome simple-ADE chord song.

    — 4 Non Blondes song. Catchy tune and has a positive element to it. Takes me back to high school sophomore year.

    As Springsteen said, “well time slips away and leaves you with nothing mister but boring stories of glory days”. Here is my boring story about that song. I was in the Army, in east Asia. That day I drove a truck to a small US base in the mountains, then I was doing something at the motorpool there. I stepped outside for a cigarette. Somebody had a radio outside, playing the US Armed Forces radio station. “What’s Up” came on as I stood there having my smoke… heard it for the first time. “Twenty five years and my life is still” lyrics came on and got my attention. I was 24.

  13. Didn’t have much money growing up, but by the time I was 15, my parents had been doing better financially and we went on our first “real” family vacation to the Outer Banks. It was a magical week. Another family was vacationing next door. Their son was my age, we hit it off. Long walks on the beach, ice cream, holding hands. First kiss. I’ll never forget him. He lived a world away from me. We stayed in touch with letters and phone calls for a while. That one week that one summer, was all we had.

    “Black” became our sorta song, we called each other and said the last lines to each other, one last time. I can never ever hear that song without thinking of him.

  14. Four Non-Blondes was catchy and clever as hell; but what really woulda have been ahead of their time and more to the point, memorable, is..

    Four Non-Whites

    W/o looking at the video, they weren’t White, right?

  15. While “Black” is obviously a great PJ song, I personally prefer “Yellow Ledbetter” and the vastly underrated “Given to Fly” as showcasing the band at full power.

    Those 90s were the last songs I really remember, because I went off to fight the wars in 2001, and I missed years of popular music, and when I came home, everyone and everything was different. It brings up a thought about war and music, as the 1940s English and American war generation were defined sonically by the big bands, Vietnam had its own soundtrack, even the Cold War of the 1980s has a definable style (“99 Luftbalons” being just one”) but my war never generated much in terms of creativity or instantly recognizable sound. Instead, we mostly got awful CivNat country songs and that Lee Greenwood song being brought out ad nauseam. Probably partially because as a war of choice, most of my generation could ignore it.

  16. Ah, Elk, your comments ready better with repetition and a few suds to boot.

    The 4 non whites lead singer nowadays looks like some mystery meat variety chick that we all see out and about. Maybe that’s what they were hinting at with the non-blondes, which I gander is where you were going with that.

    Without looking it up, I only know of the one hit for the Georgia Satellites. In college, the only other person that knew of it was from Wisconsin.

    Rowan, your short story rings true about what PA wrote with regards to time and age. In our teenage years, summers do indeed seem to last forever.

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  18. I’m Mr. Gen X, born in 1975, loved Nirvana, saw Garbage live about 8 times, and I can actually play most Nirvana songs, and Black (Mike McCready, one of the best), and Alive (great true-story red pill song about Eddie’s moronic, selfish solopsistic single mom (listen carefully)), etc., but…

    I can no longer get into or care about music discussions, given our nation’s dire straits.

    I’m using the word “nation” correctly.

  19. I mean, what we did from 2015 to November 2016 to get Trump ejected, and to see him be forced to cuck to the extreme on us for three years. I mean….

    I called the (((Jared))) problem in 2016. I said Trump acts and even talks like a New York jew.

    I went to my local meetings in 2016 and tried to tell the leaders “no Jews.”

    I was and am right.

    And they know it.

    Look at what’s going on.

    Anti semitism everywhere. Red flag laws. Virginia.

    It’s coming.

    Sad.

  20. They took down the video.

    One of the greatest performances ever recorded.

    Listen to it all.

    It is written in the starlight.
    And every line
    In your palm.
    We are fools to make war
    On our brothers
    In arms.

  21. muh brotha Publius, I’m five years older than you. Just noting that as a frame of reference in how we relate to the 90s songs. Perhaps the only thing I learned in blogging is that music always matters. Especially during a nation’s dire moment. When posting about the Warsaw Uprising ’44 and doing the due research, I discovered, to my surprise, than at the very moment when people of that time and place thought that their genocide is an inevitability, their fighting songs were upbeat and cheery as they went off to fight.

  22. The video is so great. Skinny Mark Knopfler in his ill fitting t-shirt wailing away. Not a dry eye in the house.

  23. Also Prince Harry should have married Shirley Manson. Lolzozoz he could have met her mum and her dad back in Scotland.

    Now _she_ was a little cutie.

  24. Good point. I know.

    Put my Shirley Manson upskirt live on MTV 1995 comment through.

    #1995forevah

    Shirley Manson. That’s some creamy white genetics right there.

  25. Cam I didn’t like PJ in the 1990s. I like Kurt Cobain and in 2010 I once referred to PJ as “bubblegum pop closer to Britney Spears than Nirvana.”

    Then I started playing guitar and listened to PJ really for the first time, heard the pain in the lyrics and McCready’s guitar, heard the live albums, and gained a new appreciation.
    Like their live covers of Crazy Mary where McCready goes off on 9 minute solos at the end.

    Both Kurt ( who ruined his life by marrying a sneaky, big nosed disgusting Jew psycho bitch) and Eddie are/we’re brainwashed beta leftist faggots, but that’s not their fault.

    Both are sons of boomer single moms. Important point IMO.

  26. So many typos imposed by iPhone. Not what I typed. Sorry.

    I called Courtney Love smelly, not sneaky, but she’s sneaky too.

    All good Hole songs were written by Kurt, by the way. The one good Hole album was done by Kurt and Butch Vig, who produced Nevermind and Smashing Pumpkins’ breakthrough album and then was the drummer in Garbage.

    It’s too bad Courtney Love didn’t slice lengthwise at some point before she met Kurt.

  27. Fellas, I been itchin’ to crash a thread with a Cannonball and it’s just gonna have to be here (saw them open for Nirvana). Tool is for another time.

  28. 90s was the last White decade in music. There was lip service to diversity and maybe the bass player was a girl, but the genre was rock and the guys were white.

    On the death of hair metal: I’m a genXer and was in high school when teen spirit and the Seattle sound we’re happening. My perception was that the guys who were into metal prior to nirvana were still listening to metal and a lot of Seattle was just metal(Soundgarden esp.) Nirvana wasn’t that a big a shift for us. We already looked like those guys anyways. The plaid flannel shirt skateboard shoes chain wallet jean or long leather jacket were already staples of rural youth metal culture when nirvana broke. Fans of metal, especially the more slayer Metallica megadeth types never went for the glam look(too queer) even if you liked GNR or other acceptable hair rockers. So the Seattle guys just looked like fans to us. We were more punk influenced-largely because of Metallica -misfits connection and suicidal tendencies other crossover metalish punk bands.

    Seattle was just the extinction burst of the white metal scene which had existed since the mid 60s. The real demarcation in the 90s wasn’t the early 90s and teen spirit, it was the later half when MTV went TRL boy band Aguilera Spears and started really pushing hip hop and other black genres. All of a sudden my girlfriends younger brother by about 5 years and all his friends were listening to hip hop or electronic and wearing gigantic oversized pants.

  29. I’m glad to see 80’s music put on the back burner. It’s been overplayed for years now. “Hunger Strike” and “Far Behind” are both great songs, possibly my two favorites from the 90’s.

  30. Relevant esoteric posting this morning, might would be —

    Strongheart Songs

    That’s what the Plains Indians, the Sioux, called them. Pretty self explanatory.

    There’s a line from a book, that talks about them, in a way that makes sense.

    The book is the one on Crazy Horse, by Mari Sandoz, who looks to be White but is probably part Indian, being from Nebraska and knowing about that stuff. There are some passages about how when “the people” were all but beaten sometimes they would manage to sing those songs in a way that maybe an old person heard once or twice in his life. They actually had specific songs, for the occasions, when everyone was all discouraged and shit, but had to buck up and move out. What might the lyrics have been?

    The sun is coming
    and my people are strong
    Sing with me now

    The road is long
    but my people are strong
    sing with me now

    Did you see him fight?
    Raging Bull
    his spirit lives on, in his sons

    Did you see him fight?
    Sitting Duck
    his daughters are many, and steady

    Did you see him fight?
    Many Moons
    with ten hands, he prevailed upon the Crows
    and they fear him to this day

    Did you see him fight?

    ********************

    What Strongheart Songs might we have?

    In all seriousness, the only commercial song that I comes to mind is the one from Iggy Pop that contains the lyric “I ride and I ride and I ride and I ride” and perhaps the Zeppelin songs also. Iggy Pop specifically, explicitly, imitated the Indians; he said as much.

  31. Two other good ones: “Bittersweet” by Big Head Todd and the Monsters & “Standing Outside a Broken Phone Booth with Money in My Hand” by Primitive Radio Gods.

  32. The happiest song of the 90s, happiest video too. It’s impossible to have bad feelz after watching it.

    It’s an early 90s song on the theme of Van Halen’s “Hot for the Teacher.”

    I had a certain teacher
    I always tried to impress her
    When she stood up in the classroom
    I would mentally undress her

  33. Breeders and no Pixies? No Cranberrys?

    Back to the notoriously white band Rush. RIP Neil…

    Enjoy this crowd from 2003. Toronto. Never to be repeated…

  34. “Stardog Champion.” What that band could have gone onto with Andrew Wood…we’ll never know. 1990 was a great year for hard rock. I remember that on one day in that summer I saw the video for Love/Hate’s “Blackout in the Red Room,” followed directly by the debut of Janes Addction’s “Stop.” I hadn’t planned that, I just casually turned to MTV and there they were. MTV was not always horrible and non-music oriented.

  35. “What Strongheart Songs might we have?”

    Great question, Elk. When you hear the songs of your people, you don’t “listen”. You o-b-e-y.

    Those types of songs are verboten, for obvious reasons, obviously.

    Even “country” music is not allowed to sing about the joys of bonding with your brethren over a good lynching. How country of THAT?? What a sham.

    But then again, do we hear the war songs of the Celts, the Visigoths, the Normans, about returning home from the battlefield with your enemies heads on spikes anymore? No. We get ‘Smells Like Teen Spirit’.

    FFS.

  36. PA mentioned Borderline Personality Disorder in the last thread. I’d address it there, but this is WordPress, and, well, that’s not how comments get read.

    I had a small epiphany today: BPD in a woman is what “Domestic Violence” is when blamed on men. In each case, you have the bad guy/girl lashing out in his or her sex-specific way. For men, it’s getting loud and, sometimes, violent. That is, the extreme sterotype of the sex’s worst behavior. In women, it’s being extremely shitty, manipulative, and controlling. In each case, the offender, when called out on his or her behavior, always reverts to “I’m so sorry baby I love you please don’t go.” And it works in both directions.

    Add it to your notes.

  37. Mendo: “The 4 non whites lead singer”

    Dude, that’s funny. Until today I had always thought the vocals sounded White. Looked up the video for the first time. Eyes opened.

  38. Publius: “I’m Mr. Gen X, born in 1975”

    PA and some might put you in the “latter Gen X” group, the cohort in which early Gen Xers would say “I feel more aligned with people 10 years my senior than 3 years my junior.”

    I gave this some thought, as it seemed like the force influencing this had to be external to the generation alone. Here’s my theory:

    Console games bifurcated a generation.

    If you are Gen X and you embraced PC gaming (in the beginning, Commodore 64 gaming) as a child, you probably feel like you belong to the earlier Gen X crowd. If your first experience of “Vidya” was Nintendo, you likely belong to the later cohort of Gen Xers.

    Anyone want to weigh in? I think it’s a valid demarcation.

  39. PA: “I discovered, to my surprise, than at the very moment when people of that time and place thought that their genocide is an inevitability, their fighting songs were upbeat and cheery as they went off to fight.”

    Does AC read this blog? If not, submit this to his email. It is canny af.

  40. Camlost: This will surely be an unpopular opinion but I always found Pearl Jam to be very bland.

    They were less than bland. They were a waste of guitar strings’ vibrating, made worse by their singer’s vocal cords doing the same.

    And that f**king insufferable band name.

  41. Conversation overheard at mess in 1993 from a soft-spoken but exceedingly bright junior officer: “We used to have a term in my old town for grunge before ‘grunge’ became a term. We called them ‘skids’.”

  42. PA, i now you’re commenturs are nobel peopel who work hard, but i knowticed sum errirs in dheyr speelngz and gramarrs lolzozlzlz

    “The 4 non whites lead singer”

    is a mud dyke gay “married” to (((Sara Gilbert))) (who’s asking for a “divorce!”) and most known today for producing P!nk’s “Get This Party Started” among other deep and thoughtful tunes for the likes of Gwen Stefani, Britney Spears, and Christina Aguilera.

    “Also Prince Harry should have married Shirley Manson”

    Shirley Manson is fifty-three years old.

    –Which might have spared SOME problems–and you’ve a right to fantasize about the 1996 incarnation; but to be technical Shirley M.’s been in MILF territory since Version 2.0. Hell when she was singing “Stupid Girl” she was already THIRTY.

  43. 1975, but tail end, in late December. I played Atari with my uncles when I’d spend weekends at grandma’s. My mom is the oldest kid out of five, she was 20 when I was born and her two youngest siblings are closer in age to me than her. Later we got Colecovision, a platformer console. I never had a PC at home when I was very young, but my Catholic school won a grant and got a limited number of commodore 64s and I was an honors student who was allowed to learn BASIC and do some programming. Cool.

    Nintendo was really my gaming console, later on I played SEGA. I beat Metroid, took me a year without cheat codes. Damn. Never got into FPS or MMORP games, by the time they were popular I was immersed in my nature adventures, music, and writing. I eschewed most technological entertainment for many years, so vidya games grew in leaps and bounds while I was otherwise involved.

    So many great songs in the Revue. I let my daughter borrow my iPod a few months ago and she washed it with her jeans. Sigh. She’s only eleven, I should have supervised better. I had glorious playlists stored, all of my 90s favorites from the popular to the obscure.

    Anyone looking for a pre-K primer on 90s music could do worse than looking to The Singles soundtrack. It encapsulates more than just the Seattle scene. The Screaming Trees “Nearly Lost You” and The Lovemongers cover of “Battle of Evermore” thrill me. Paul Westerberg could have had a glorious career if The Replacements hadn’t pissed it all away in a drunken haze that assumed success didn’t require diligence.

  44. “I much prefer to be bewitched for five minutes than hypnotized for an hour.”
    —T. Takemitsu, Spring 1994

    The ’90s encapsulated/brought up to date, ‘without additives’:

  45. Grunge could have been this. It came out at the same time. But no, give us Barabbus! said the retarded muppets.

    Easter egg for PA

  46. Makes me want to study why certain people prefer certain types of music. I think it would reveal a lot about human psychology.

    Unfortunately the only grant money left is allocated to globalist propaganda, and I can’t afford to fund my own research.

    Well, not yet. Hopefully some day.

  47. “Makes me want to study why certain people prefer certain types of music. I think it would reveal a lot about human psychology.”

    I don’t think one could overestimate the degree to which the music that reaches our ears is curated, and how much that drives our “preferences”.

    If race centric war drum music for whites was allowed you’d have a thousand bands competing to make the best pro-white war drum music, instead of a thousand bands competing to be the next Nirvana or Pearl Jam.

    And… if you want to look at the deeper layers… suicidal musicians (Cobain), hard luck drunks (Johnny Cash), and do-gooder supercucks (Bono, Vedder) get movies made about them and, if alive, get record deals while literally having one foot in the grave.

    Now why is that?

  48. — If race centric war drum music for whites was allowed you’d have a thousand bands competing to make the best pro-white war drum music, instead of a thousand bands competing to be the next Nirvana or Pearl Jam.

    I wonder what that would sound like.

  49. I wonder the same thing myself, PA. I’m thinking it would make White Snake sound like the Backstreet Boys.

  50. — “If race centric war drum music for whites was allowed you’d have a thousand bands competing to make the best pro-white war drum music, instead of a thousand bands competing to be the next Nirvana or Pearl Jam.

    I wonder what that would sound like.”

    Probably something like this, when redcoat grenadiers conquered an empire.

  51. Maybe here are two examples of such songs. It occurs to me that such a song NOT be warlike. For example, I thought of RATM “Killing in the Name Of” as an example of a good war song but with White lyrics. But that’s not it. Angry songs pump you up and then you’ve spent your vigor once the song is over.

    “Serbia Strong”, must have immortal man on the accordion:

    .
    And then there is “Dixie” with a resounding Rebel Yell. Clapping and cheering along:

  52. Thanks for reminding me about the Singles soundtrack. I used to play “Chloe Dancer / Crown of Thorns” on repeat loop.

  53. — If race centric war drum music for whites was allowed you’d have a thousand bands competing to make the best pro-white war drum music,

    Soviet era hymns have that quality. “Internationale”, which is a 19th century French composition, is one. If you’re an educated man and you’re not familiar with that song, you are not educated.

    The USSR anthem too.

    Something about the full-lungs melody.

  54. “If you’re an educated man and you’re not familiar with that song, you are not educated.”

    Challenge accepted, you commie bastard.

  55. Let it be known that “you commie bastards!!!!!!!” was something yelled at my comrades and me when we were formed up on the parade square in 1990, shouted from a Camaro or Firebird as it whizzed past on the road paid for by common taxes.

  56. Most versions of “Internationale” I see on youtube are pretty good, except the English language one. The official Soviet recording is the touchstone. There is also a scene from Warren Beatty’s “Reds” that has that song. Also videos from the USSR and East Germany, in which you see the large assembly get up on its feet in totalitarian conformity to sing that hymn.

    Communism, Lenin [whom you see in that Reds scene], came from the bowels of Hell but the Internationale was rousing.

    All of the Communists became liberal capitalists in 1989 because to have a career in the Party you needed to be an atheist, real or pretend. In other words, those were not solid people.

    Anyhow, I am giving a lot of thought to Plumpjack’s great notion that there is this White War Music that the recording industries forbid and instead steer talent toward rock/pop and its present forms. I think the Volkish sounds of “Serbia Strong” and “Dixie” that I linked to above have that lynching-festival quality.

    Maybe the big deal about Rock n Roll in the 1950s, along with Elvis making music pelvic, is that music took a turn away from communal and toward the individual. All of rock/pop is in this “individual” bracket. Dance songs, sexy mood songs, anguish over failed romance songs, get pumped up songs, angry songs, contemplation songs — it’s all about the self. You can’t rally a posse with that kind of music, but it does sure feel right when you want to look inward.

  57. “Maybe the big deal about Rock n Roll in the 1950s, along with Elvis making music pelvic, is that music took a turn away from communal and toward the individual.”

    I think that hits it exactly on the mark.

    And not just towards the individual, but towards the type of individuality (and individuals) that fits the matrix narrative.

    There is still “communal” music being promoted, but here in the occupied-US it is ALWAYS of the multi-culti variety.

    “lynching-festival quality”

    Now THERE’S a genre I’d like to see listed on Spotify. “Alexa, play me some upbeat lynching festival music.”

  58. Here’s an interesting factoid for real American music buffs. Dixie is hoakey as hell, and not in the good way.

    The first verse and chorus are good lyrics, but the other verses following, two three and four, are AWFUL AWFUL AWFUL AWFUL, as in really bad. I’m not just being a snob here. Also, the song itself has a history that goes against what it would represent.

    Verses two three and four, need rewritten. Consider this a challenge. I will put up a rewrite, of those verses, later, maybe. Someone has to do it.

  59. The reason we don’t have inspiring Let’s do this songs, or at least active and contemporary versions of such, is because the feeling and motivation involved, have to be REAL!

    There’s any number of songs from the “traditional songbook” that would slash will fit the bill. It’s not exactly a secret that the traditional American songbook is vast and rich.

    On the genre of contemporary country. That stuff is literally nauseating. They all talk about how “country” they are — and that’s all they talk about. In addition to “having a good time” and unscrewing some beer caps, and getting down with Mary Sue in the tight jeans. Are those people, in those videos, even real?

  60. “On the genre of contemporary country. That stuff is literally nauseating.”

    Not just contemporary country, but also the previous generation of the 70s and 80s. The country artists who “made it”, talented as they were, only made it because they survived the pro-matrix vetting process.

    In that genre there is a seismic lyrical tilt towards the APPROVED version of a red state denizen – the perpetually drunk, broken, and/or lonesome, and/or womanizing man/cowboy, and an equally obvious tilt AWAY from the UNAPPROVED values of the ACTUAL red state ideal – blood/family, soil/territory, community, God, nature, etc.

    The penultimate example, to me, of the ‘approved’ type of broken, multi-culti-friendly country western singer is Johnny Cash. But he’s not really country, is he?

    So how about the other big ones? Waylon Jennings… One of his most popular songs is “Mama’s Don’t let Your Babies Grow Up to Be Cowboys.” That’s about as matrix-approved a narrative as you can get. “Hey pardner, wouldya mind passing me a couple of fentanyls and that bottle of Jack, please? Mighty kind of ya.”

  61. ” APPROVED version of a red state denizen – the perpetually drunk, broken, and/or lonesome, and/or womanizing man/cowboy, and an equally obvious tilt AWAY from the UNAPPROVED values of the ACTUAL red state ideal – blood/family, soil/territory, community, God, nature, etc. ”

    I actually agree with that assessment. Basically, its a world view where southern whites are told to be happy with being poor while working a menial job and having ” shoes on their feet “. Of course this also includes a reflexive adoration of the ” flag ” and the military no matter what.

    This same type of psychological tactic is used on simians where the only messages in rap are about getting laid, hustling ” product “, getting big rapping, or getting big playin b-ball.

    The messaging in modern heavy rock music mainly focuses on a self-absorbed nihilism, depression, and how f-uped one’s life, society, and family is.

    Lets all guess who runs all three music industries.

  62. Also the prevalent theme of needing to leave one’s home town because it feels like you’re dying there. I once noted ten or so songs on that theme. To recall a few now: (((Piano Man))), Born To Run… but there is a whole vein of those songs once you start thinking of that theme.

    Mellencamp’s “Small Town” was a counterpoint.

    Springsteen’s “My Hometown” hit a little too close to the truth of neoliberalism.

    Geographic mobility was America’s weak spot that nation wreckers hammered on.

  63. If it’s a file on your device, you have to save it to a third party site like imgur. Or start a placeholder wordpress blog where you can post the image and then have the link for the comments here.

  64. I do love Willie Nelson’s ‘Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain”, but he is LITERALLY a 6 million percent, matrix-approved dope-smoking hippie deployed against the weak-minded as a kinder, gentler, “ideal” version of “redneck”, one who’s in touch with his feminine side.

    You could go down the list of “artists” like this forever, across all genres. If it’s free and readily available for listening, then it’s almost guaranteed to be a sham, unless by it’s very aesthetic it is non-threatening (to the matrix). That would include a lot of instrumental music, so long as it’s not TOO beautiful and inspired.

    If an instrumental piece is TOO beautiful and inspired, then it must be Peter Gabriel-ed by adding some West African drumming solos and black backup vocals.

  65. ” Also the prevalent theme of needing to leave one’s home town because it feels like you’re dying there ”

    However, in defense of this theme. Its the basic foundation of the ” hero ” mythos , where the hero to be always leaves his place of birth to go on a quest or to seek adventure.

  66. The hero comes home or dies on his quest.

    — If an instrumental piece is TOO beautiful and inspired, then it must be Peter Gabriel-ed by adding some West African drumming solos and black backup vocals.

    The black chorus on “I wanna know what love is,” though they didn’t do those R&B’ish affectations yet. Whitney Houston schlockifying that gentle Dolly Parton ballad.

  67. That Billy Joel song piano man has an interesting, but it can’t be told here and now, for two reasons —

    1) it’s boomer posting
    2) see (1), above

    But this lyric particular lyric has always been the best example of a song lyric

    And the waitress is practicing politics
    as the businessmen slowly get stoned
    Yes they’re sharing a drink they call loneliness
    but it’s better than drinking alone

    that works as a lyric but at the same time is really bad. In a sort of “it’s so bad it’s good” but actually the opposite of that: “it’s so good it’s bad” but not really that either. The whole song is like that. There used to be a story about old BJ growing up not knowing about his jewish background, but that may be apocryphal.

    Sidenote: What does apocryphal mean?

  68. What was small town USA like in the 70s? Do those lines reflect the way regular people felt, or is that a restless songwriter’s projection?

    Now John at the bar is a friend of mine
    He gets me my drinks for free
    And he’s quick with a joke or to light up your smoke
    But there’s someplace that he’d rather be
    He says, “Bill, I believe this is killing me”
    As the smile ran away from his face
    “Well I’m sure that I could be a movie star
    If I could get out of this place”

    I wasn’t here until ’82 and was twelve then. From my impressions, people were upbeat and content.

    The next one feels more authentic. It’s not how it looks, people putting their place down. Rather, it’s small-town humility in face of a talented bar musician. America was seen as a plance where you follow your dreams, so if you’re that good, it’s lovely to have you here in Allentown:

    And they sit at the bar and put bread in my jar
    And say, “Man, what are you doin’ here?”

  69. He says, “Bill, I believe this is killing me”
    As the smile ran away from his face
    “Well I’m sure that I could be a movie star
    If I could get out of this place”

    It’s unlikely those words have even been said, at a bar. Excepting of course, in the context of that song!

    Even at a gay bar, they would ring unrealistic and, well, gay. [Side note: Who has been to a gay bar, and why?]

    Certainly though, the feeling that they get at, is a very real thing.

    There is a scene in the ALL TIME CLASSIC American novel, A Fan’s Notes. In which the narrator relates his life story, one episode of which is when he hung out at a super cool bar, it musta been NYC, with everyone a tough guy wannabe pretendes and but among them was Steve McQueen. And the author made the point that McQueen stood out from the crowd, as “better than the rest” and they all knew it. He had a full head of hair and was going places. And sure enough he did.

  70. And they sit at the bar and put bread in my jar
    And say, “Man, what are you doin’ here?”

    This on the other hand, has been spoken exactly, a MILLION TIMES!

    I have heard it myself, in reference to myself, more than once..

    On the balance though, it might be said the Billy Joel has a tin ear for barroom dialogue. Otoh he wasn’t writing a play.

  71. This is copyrighted; sorta; seriously.

    *************************

    I want to love someone
    I want to be a man
    I want to to it today
    (yeah you can)

    This same old world
    this same old song
    this same old eggs
    (prove me wrong)

    These wo wo worries
    salty tears
    add up to nothing
    (add up to nothing)

    Em7 Em7 Em7 Em7
    D6 D6 D6 D6 D6
    A7 A7 A7 A7
    A7 A6 A7 A6

  72. Whitney Houston’s “I Will Always Love You” is too sappy for my tastes. I like “Saving All My Love For You”, though. It has more sex appeal.

  73. That article (Lancet, not Breitbart) was written by a black female. Her brand of hate is a nonwhite’s loathing of the European. It’s not just a black thing. East Asians use just about the same rote vocabulary. I recently saw a tweet from a Vietnamese living in Ireland saying that if some Irish people dislike diversity they should move out of Ireland.

    The global order was set up by elite Jews. The game is for everyone else to believe that destroying Whites is the highest good.

    In apocalyptic language, the armies of Heaven and Hell are moving their pieces into place. The other side has the rainbow flag, which is all I need to know about how that story ends.

    In historical language, this is the second great offensive of Communism, one hundred years after the first one.

  74. ” Her brand of hate is a nonwhite’s loathing of the European. It’s not just a black thing. East Asians use just about the same rote vocabulary. I recently saw a tweet from a Vietnamese living in Ireland saying that if some Irish people dislike diversity they should move out of Ireland. ”

    With that in mind, you should read some of the quotes in the following story.

    – “I speak Polish in school and Vietnamese at home”. Stories of the Vietnamese diaspora in Poland –

    https://notesfrompoland.com/2019/12/27/i-speak-polish-in-school-and-vietnamese-at-home-stories-of-the-vietnamese-diaspora-in-poland/?fbclid=IwAR0xYJcuHAXMDC_MI0rNJ5oInCKX6JOqIMZ6Tf30WulSI-uIDtDa6e5qIa4

  75. “The global order was set up by elite Jews. The game is for everyone else to believe that destroying Whites is the highest good.”

    That said, most people arent evil. Or maybe more descriptively, most people arent wolves. Most people are cows. Nonwhites say and think what they do because they follow the herd, which thinks as it’s told by evil people. It’s also natural for a diaspora to feel contempt for its host country. In the case of nonwhites in the West, it’s part inferiority complex, part “cant believe our good luck” that they are allowed to be there. This is why if the world is to reverse its course toward barbarism and return to civilization, it will remove all Diversity from Western countries.

  76. ” It’s also natural for a diaspora to feel contempt for its host country. ”

    That is why it must never be allowed in Poland.

  77. The woman who wrote that article is a pediatrician living in San Francisco. I listened to a few minutes of a podcast with her and other WOC this morning. It sounds like she spends most of her time traveling around the country speaking about ‘health justice’ (as she put it) rather than actually meeting with patients. In addition, she writes articles like this one in support of the extinction of White people. She has an annoying valley girl type accent. She’s a loser.
    I’ve never heard myself over the radio so I don’t want to be too judgmental, but why does it seem like so many grown woman try to make their voices sound like teenage girls on the radio or in public. Case in point, Christine Blasey Ford. She seemed like she was trying to sound like a 10 year old girl during her testimony. It’s not natural.

  78. “She has an annoying valley girl type accent. She’s a loser.”

    Thats a feature of instant world news. Every time some idiot says something, we hear about it. Like that pediatrician.

    The downside is that it’s unpleasant to see the parasitic frenzy of people living in our countries on such stark display. The upside is that all of those articles and tweets are killing the carefully cultivated fiction that diversity works in any way other than destroying every desirable feature of civilization. It’s also invalidated the myth that if you do something kind for an outgroup, especially on your own soil, that it will be appreciated.

  79. “” It’s also natural for a diaspora to feel contempt for its host country. ”

    That is why it must never be allowed in Poland.”

    LMAO

    Were you trying to be funny there, Sun God? Because that is figgin’ hilarious.

  80. Deportation of ungrateful, invasive, childless musicians on American soil starts in an hour. When the truck shows up you better get in. No personal belongings other than what you can carry on your pockets. That means no keyboards or stuffed animals.

  81. “I wasn’t here until ’82 and was twelve then. From my impressions, people were upbeat and content.”

    I wish I could go back in time with my adult eyes and see what life was really like here in the 70s and 80s. My impression is that it was NOT exactly the bucolic Eden that the DR makes it out to be. In many ways it was better, but in other ways it was worse.

    Better: You had more freedom and space to do whatever the hell you wanted. There were far fewer people. The West Coast was, in many ways, an Eden. Just not culturally, like people think it was.

    For families like mine, the freedom and space to do what we wanted was enough. We didn’t care about niggers, as long as they were somewhere else. Asians and Pacific Islanders brought an infusion of culture and knowledge that in some ways filled in the gaps of what small town Americana was lacking. (The movie ‘A Bronx Tale’ did a great job capturing the cultural crossroads that many young Americans felt they were trapped in at the time).

    Not better/Worse: There was plenty of intertribal fighting. The hicks who showed up from Louisiana were not your friends just because they were white. Tons of alcoholism. Very low ambition and/or spiritual questioning of the wider world and universe. Vietnam was fresh in everyone’s mind and everyone had a story to share about someone who collected Viet Cong ears.

    Smart, talented kids could easily go underutilized. Things were too comfy. It is still this way in small towns across America. The insularity is a form of cultural death. If you grew up in a religious family, you resented being fed dogma that you knew was a scientifically and spiritually incomplete view of the universe. You knew there was more to know, and the members of your own tribe who tried to prevent you from questioning things were, in many, your adversaries.

    My overall impression of my time growing up in small town, “unspoiled” America was that people took their freedom for granted and did not utilize it as much as they should have. But it wasn’t their fault. They were incapable of being “woke” because their cultural destiny had predetermined that being in a bubble was the only way it could be.

  82. PA I thought of you the other day while listening to “Currency” by The Black Angels. That band has some songs with very good lyrics- I don’t like all their stuff but a few of their albums with that “Currency” sound. They are a current band out of Austin TX which made me suspect they might be lefty, but I’m not convinced they are.

    That’s not the music I listened to in my younger years. My first punk rock show was in 86 when i was 16 – Social Distortion, back during their heavy eyeliner years. Lots of racial conflict in the high school I attended…. so by 87 I was wearing Docs and listening to Skrewdriver. Used to listen to lots of Oi! music.

    Then went to Front 242, KMFDM, Skinny Puppy etc – which formed the beginning of the sounds I like most today which is music from Extrawelt, Codex Empire, Ancient Methods.

    I also am really into King Dude, Of the Wand and the Moon, etc.

    Most of all I recommend everyone here go to YouTube and watch the live “Lifa” concert by Heilung. Heilung pits on a he’ll of a show and you WILL feel connected to your Pagan roots.

  83. Hopefully this posts. Anyhow PA, I took this photo from one of my visiting nieces kindergarten school books. Everyone should remember, this is from a 97% to 99% religiously , ethnically, racially, and culturally homogeneous nation. Like I stated many times before, the ZioBorg is patient as they’ll bypass the older and current resisting generations and go straight for the minds of the young ones. How many ” things ” dont fit in this picture ?

    //s.imgur.com/min/embed.js

  84. ” LMAO

    Were you trying to be funny there, Sun God? Because that is figgin’ hilarious. ”

    Of course I understand the irony of my statement, but your people allowed everyone to come here, including me. Its also by living in you great ” multi- kult ” utopia that I’ve arrived at the conclusion behind my statement. In fact, deport all the illegals, muds, dot heads, and other detritus from your nation first, at which point, you can then come and tell me to leave which I will happily do . Till you actually grow the collective balls to accomplish that I kindly suggest you stay quiet douche bag.

  85. Most of all I recommend everyone here go to YouTube and watch the live “Lifa” concert by Heilung. Heilung pits on a he’ll of a show and you WILL feel connected to your Pagan roots.

    Yeah that was really good.

  86. Asians and Pacific Islanders brought an infusion of culture and knowledge that in some ways filled in the gaps of what small town Americana was lacking.

    Chinese food and fortune cookies?

    “Someday you will look back on this with fond memories” — my so-called Chinese food

  87. Let this be a cautionary tale about marrying outside of your race. The British people are now being smeared as racist.

  88. “Chinese food and fortune cookies?”

    In m 70s and 80s America martial arts were a godsend for kids looking to reconnect with their own warrior culture. Where else could you learn how to punch, kick, use swords, meditate, and train for man to man combat? Your choices before Asians brought that stuff in was boxing and wrestling. Good stuff but not enough.

    It also didn’t hurt to see firsthand families that: stayed together, pulled their resources, worked together across all generations, respected their elders, pushed their kids to excel in school, purchased real estate aggressively… This was all very eye opening to American kids raised by comfy boomers, and we took notice.

  89. “Of course I understand the irony of my statement, but your people allowed everyone to come here, including me. Its also by living in you great ” multi- kult ” utopia that I’ve arrived at the conclusion behind my statement.”

    America’s strength was always it’s greatest weakness: a tolerant and welcoming attitude towards individual freedom. It used to be a great thing… until the entire world wanted a part of that and invited themselves over.

    It is like that movie ‘Coccoon’, where all the boomers discover a fountain of youth when aliens lay eggs in their swimming pool. Then everyone wants a part and all the life force is drained away and nobody gets anything. Then some of the boomers fly off with the aliens so they can theoretically have eternal life, free of hip replacements, hearing aids and colostomy bags. A more perfect metaphor for an entire generation in movie format has never been made.

  90. RE: Cobra Kai review. I discovered The Critical Drinker some time early last year. His shtick is just as his name suggests, however he does provide good analysis of films and the wokeness/poz infesting movies and TV shows. He ramps up his accent to give a the sound of a drunk Irishman (I think he’s Irish) talking; similar to Foster Brooks, just not over the top like Foster. His videos are not too long and he really rips into challahwood.

    RE: Billy Joel. I’ll admit, growing up I enjoyed a number of his songs. What really sealed the deal for me was back in the early 90s, VH1 (‘member them?) would have an entire day devoted to an artist, though I only remember them having just done two, Joel and Rod Stewart. They played all the videos for most of his hits over and over again. It was like playlist on repeat. Now, I cannot listen to a song of his I really like, We Didn’t Start The Fire, since it seems he’s being sneaky, in that (((usual))) kind of way, saying, “hey, this isn’t our fault. We didn’t start it”, while simultaneously clasping his hands saying “they’ll never know.”

    RE: martial arts. Good analysis, PJ. I remember growing up and the awful Cannon films with American Ninja this and that, were all the rage, enticing young men to want to emulate what they saw. I always wanted to join up but never got around to it. Still, it does provide good training and discipline for those undertaking it. Years later I found out about why the different belt classes progress by color. After that, I recollected of my middle school days about overhearing kids saying they were black belt this and that and realizing what a load that was.

  91. The Critical Drinker some time early last year. His shtick is just as his name suggests, however he does provide good analysis of films and the wokeness/poz infesting movies and TV shows. He ramps up his accent to give a the sound of a drunk Irishman (I think he’s Irish) talking

    Scottish though. I am not a fan of his act (his drunk act), but his criticism is good on its merits. He made a really good meta point about criticism, and where a lot of wannabe critics go wrong: criticism isn’t, or shouldn’t be, primarily about Themes.

    He says that any story will have Themes, and they will all be variations on the same (essentially, variations on the Monomyth), and that the themes that seem relevant to one viewer will be particular to that viewer. He says instead, that the critic should focus on the nuts and bolts of the storytelling.

    The genres that he likes are mainly sci fi and fantasy. Those two genres are where most of the talent seems to have gone, in made-for-the-screen storytime stories. [The world left me behind a long time ago, and I prefer realism and drama, as far as genres]

    However I did watch the Witcher, which is the new Netflix big deal. It’s kind of cool but actually it sucks. The hero, what’s-is-name, is a cool looking swordsman, very White, very Nordic, and the sword play is really sharp. But the storytelling fails on a lot of levels. Not least of all in how it includes blacks where they don’t belong, and women, where they don’t belong either: as swordsmen: in a word, not believable.

    The other review that he did, which seems relevant to real world themes we discuss here, was on the movie release from the 90s or whenever tf, of Clan of the Cave Bear (1986) with Daryl Hannah. In his review he says that the movie was actually not-bad, and fairly well done. But it failed to live up to expectations, for reasons manifold.

    What was interesting about the movie and the series it was based on, which were the books by Jean M. Auel, is that their premise was that the blonde heroin was Cro Magnon and she done got intermixed and bred up, by the big hairy Neanderthals, which premise at the time was racy and fringe, and put down by snooty academics, but which it turns was right on the money. How do those books stand up, as fiction?

  92. — He says that any story will have Themes, and they will all be variations on the same (essentially, variations on the Monomyth), and that the themes that seem relevant to one viewer will be particular to that viewer. He says instead, that the critic should focus on the nuts and bolts of the storytelling.

    That’s not a bad point. I used to remember a dozen or so formally named approaches to literary criticism.

    PS: Heilung is awesome.

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