Idle Thoughts On Cover Songs

The covering of another artist’s song is an homage to the original. Sometimes the cover eclipses its predecessor, like Jeff Buckley’s version of “Hallelujah.” Some covers reimagine the original, like Tori Amos’ take on “Smells Like Teen Spirit.” John Lennon said that “Across the Universe” is among his favorite Beatles’ songs, and the one whose lyrics rise to the level of poetry. Laibach does a fine live cover of that song.

As stories, popular songs are a witness to their time, and in inspired cases, prophets. The no-fault divorce gave powerful men a shot at younger wives and ordinary men paid the price. Kenny Rogers’ “Lucille” takes us to the late 1970s and feminism’s blitz. The narrator approaches a woman at a bar. She removes her wedding band and tells him that she’s looking for more than what she has. He then sees her husband walk in:

In the mirror, I saw him and I closely watched him
I thought how he looked out of place
He came to the woman who sat there beside me
He had a strange look on his face
The big hands were calloused, he looked like a mountain
For a minute I thought I was dead
But he started shaking, his big heart was breaking
He turned to the woman and said:

“You picked a fine time to leave me, Lucille
With four hungry children and a crop in the field
I’ve had some bad times, lived through some sad times
But this time your hurting won’t heal
You picked a fine time to leave me, Lucille”

The broken husband leaves, the speaker and the woman go to a motel. But he can’t perform, thinking of how he’s wronging another man. The story is set in Toledo, Ohio. That was almost forty years ago, before agribusiness, HUD-driven neighborhood wrecking, and recently, refugee resettlement. The great Waylon Jennings covers the song but his style does not do it justice. Also, none of the other performers I checked out on YouTube did the song right. In this case, the song truly belongs to the storyteller himself, Kenny Rogers.

Studying the guitar revealed to me the pleasure of watching amateur musicians cover popular songs. For example, this well done rendition of the guitar solos in Pink Floyd’s Comfortably Numb, which make me better understand David Gilmour’s. Another video shows a music class performing Dream Theater’s Pull Me Under. Great job on their part, and a fine instrumental analysis that song. Another musician performs Mother Love Bone’s Stargazer, delivering a low-key interpretation of Andrew Wood’s flamboyant original that paradoxically still expresses its spirit.

Sometimes a cover does not strive for novel interpretation. Brazilian band Fleesh replicates Roger Water’s Final Cut, amplifying the volcanic pathos of the original via a female vocalist, to good effect.

For the end of this post, I wanted to show a video of one of several youth choruses from Eastern Europe performing a popular song. But I decided to not do that, and instead have you imagine the optics and the easy synergy of an ethnically pure group of vocalists. My original intent was to leave things on an aspirational note, and it still is. We all have a clear understanding of neoliberalism, the evil of our time.

But do we always have a clear positive vision of what we could have? Showing a joyful chorus of bright-faced young people of one nation would evoke a pang of hunger: I want that! It no doubt would, but this point (as someone elsewhere put it), images of nothing but White people are like porn to us. And given the all-too-apt simile, by posting such a video I would be enabling prurient interest in things that belong to others. Those videos, while properly modest, are more beautiful than is proper to display.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, sometimes its pregnant absence and the imagination’s resulting effort to generate its own vision is worth even more. We on the AltRight know what we want, but do we always see it clearly?

And finally, last year Disturbed recorded their grim cover of “Sounds of Silence.” Interesting video too. Any meaning in those scenes of exodus?

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223 thoughts on “Idle Thoughts On Cover Songs

  1. but this point (as someone elsewhere put it), images of nothing but White people are like porn to us. And given the all-too-apt simile, by posting such a video I would be enabling prurient interest in things that belong to others. Those videos, while properly modest, are more beautiful than is proper to display.

    I can’t be sure I got the meaning there.

    Had you paedophilia in mind (prurient), or something quite alike?

    [Nothing like that. I was considering posting one of two videos of high school students in a choir, and there were very pretty, radiant girls and the whole presentation came across as robustly healthy. Boys were there too, but normally one’s attention does not gravitate there. I wanted to avoid posting something that features hot girls as metaphor. I also want to push away from the pro-White focus on our women’s beauty. Better to show visuals of male virtues as aspirational images. Female beauty should be pulled from display at this point, if that makes sense. — PA]

    Innocence is the only thing so beautiful as to make it unadvised to display it I can think of.

    [you put that well here.]

    No doubt that imagining beauty is a great exercise for the mind.

  2. This is a good online station that plays nothing but cover songs. It “uncovers” some really good stuff now and then.

    http://somafm.com/covers/

    I like cover songs. It’s fascinating to see how much a song can be transformed. Probably the ultimate case is Hendrix doing Dylan’s “All Along the Watchtower.” But there are other good ones. Patti Smith had a nice album of cover songs. And this one is pretty gay, by which I mean lesbian, but one of my favorite covers ever is Indigo Girls rendition of “Romeo and Juliet” by Dire Straits. A real case of turning the song into what it was meant to be all along.

    And yeah, the weird clown dude singing “Royals.”

    https://youtu.be/VBmCJEehYtU .

  3. In my view The Final Cut is a Pink Floyd album (and one of the very best, second only to DSoTM). Waters was fed up with having to compromise the purity of his genius with Gilmour. Well, “Pros and Cons” was mostly written at the same time as the Wall material. Compare the two albums.

    Shockingly, Waters without Gilmour turned out to be actually worse than Gilmour without Waters — and Gilmour without Waters isn’t much, IMO.

    It’s a shame they couldn’t get along.

    I’ve known other guys who though they were being undermined by the collaborators who in fact restrained their impulse to self-sabotage. Like TS Eliot and RA Heinlein, Waters needed a second opinion. We’d all like to be the lone genius who does it all and always knows best, but even Roger f****** Waters isn’t really that guy.

    I get the impression Noel Gallagher still thinks he didn’t really need Liam to bring his songs to life. Sure, Liam’s a godawful maniac, but he’s still half the picture.

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  5. “Roger McGuinn covering Dylan’s “One More Cup of Coffee”? Yikes!”

    Hah! We were listening at the same time (no homo). Pretty awful. Yes, that station does serve up some brutal stuff sometimes.

  6. peterike, i can’t believe you like the Indigo Girls; i notice that a lot with Alt-righters —— they sure don’t extend their politics into what comes out of their headphones.

    Ditto that for PA, too.

  7. “peterike, i can’t believe you like the Indigo Girls”

    I don’t in general. But they had one very good album in 1992, “Rights of Passage,”
    and a few decent songs on either side of it. And a lot of crap. I don’t know anything about their more recent stuff.

  8. “they sure don’t extend their politics into what comes out of their headphones.”

    Well if you did that you couldn’t listen to anything!

  9. Took me a while to warm up to cover songs, since I was always such a purist in liking the original.

    As I got older, I had an appreciation for them I never thought I would. The ones that stand out most notably are:

    “Summer Breeze” by Type O-Negative. (Who’d thought a folksy 70s song would work well in a goth format.)*

    “Heart of Glass” by Mini Mansions. (Really livens the poppy Blondie version, in a gritty sort of way)

    Honorable Mention: “Hey Bulldog” by Toad the Wet Sprocket. (What can I say, I’m a product of the 90s!)*

    Those are the ones I can think of from the top of my head. Will add more as they come to mind.

    * Ironically enough, both these songs were on the I Know What You Did Last Summer soundtrack

  10. I knew I forgot one that I just recently started liking:

    Hidden Citizens “Silent Running” from the old Mike & The Mechanics song.

  11. “Imagine” is the anthem of poz, but I must say that I really enjoy A Perfect Circle’s brooding rendition.

  12. Matthew Walker: 100% agreement with you on Waters/Gilmour and such partnerships in general. David Gilmour is a bona fide master of slow- to mid-tempo melody, Roger Waters was the “sneering madman” creative energy. To understand them in terms of the four elements, Waters is Air and Fire, Gilmour is Water. No significant presence of Earth between them.

    As to Indigo Girls, not my thing, though my guitarist friend liked them in college, even met them and picked their brains about guitar playing. He said that they were very nice and great to talk with.

    Along that niche, I liked Melissa Etheridge’s first two albums in the early 1990s, self-titled and “Brave and Crazy.” They’re quite good. “Similar Features” is an excellent song, lots of other good ones there.

    Mendo: it also took me a long time to warm up to covers (and live versions), pretty much until I started playing the guitar eight years ago. It taught me a better appreciation of musicianship.

  13. FWIW, and it ain’t worth much at all —— I think that angsty rendition of “Imagine” is weak.
    All that mock-reflective pensiveness creates the rock mood and genre I term “corn-on-the-macabre,” i.e., you laugh at its attempt to be so drearily serious.

    (pssst, sleazy rock-cred anecdote time, cleared in advance by the blog host: I interviewed the singer of A Perfect Circle in L.A., basically for the intent of publicizing the debut of that band, as he was up to then known solely for fronting Tool; I recall us spending the afternoon at his home/rehearsal spot, a big open industrial loft downtown borne out of a old, discarded warehouse-type building; i remember i was nauseous all afternoon after eating some bad Pho downtown in L.A.’s Chinatown just before walking a few blocks to his loft. Keenan is a big rap fan and was singing Snoop Dogg songs in-between our discussions.)

  14. I do appreciate the rock journo anecdotes indeed. Even when I hadn’t ever heard of the band until the comments here.

    Mendo, another noteworthy cover of a 1970s song done in the 1990s spirit: Neil Diamond’s “Girl You’ll Be a Woman Soon” remade by Urge Overkill, which of course was played during Uma Thurman’s overdose scene in Pulp Fiction.

  15. For a 70s song done by a 90s band, I like Hater’s version of “Mona Bone Jakon” by Cat Stevens (Yusuf Islam). Hater was a Soundgarden side project, and included the brother of Andrew Wood. They turn a song that might have been on the Harold and Maude soundtrack into Iggy & the Stooges. Hater also recorded a version of “Blistered,” a Billy Edd Wheeler song that was covered by Johnny Cash.

    Blue Cheer’s version of “Summertime Blues” is another one to crank up and annoy the neighbors.

    Among guitar players of a certain age, Jeff Beck’s version of Stevie Wonder’s “Cause We’ve Ended as Lovers” is essential listening.

  16. It’s funny that if you grow up listening to a cover version of a song, you invariably find the original lamer than the cover.

  17. Lothar, you stumped the resident popcrit blowhard, who never knew of Hater til now.

    And we’re on the same page re. taste in covers: Blue Cheer is the under-heralded progenitor of 60s noise pop. Sonic Youth owe them their creative muses and perhaps some back royalties. As for Beck’s instrumental reimagining of Wonder? Right on. Brilliant! ( As was Beck’s rendition of Mingus’ “Goodbye Porkpie Hat.”)

  18. 1. Pearl Jam — “Reign O’er Me”
    2. Louis Armstrong — “St. James Infirmary”
    3. Cowboy Junkies — “Sweet Jane”

    Many have, and will continue to cover “Summertime” phenomenally.

  19. Redo: don’t how those inital two repeated sentences above got into the field…

    EPG,

    Nice, thanks for the breadth and for triggering Armstrong’s Infirmary blues; it’s been a while.

    I’m all for the sharing of lists; the personal moments it triggers often has precious nothing to do with the more objective merits or not of said song, but everything to do with fleshing out one’s personal here and now and how it came to be in terms of priority.

    So, with that in mind it makes perfect sense to me that everyone’s lists are perplexing to each and everyone else’s..

    I’m a mid-aged X-er, coming into the world at the end of the 20th-century’s craziest decade in terms of pop radicalism meeting a sizable baby-boom demographic. So i’m among the elder end of the conceivable grunge demographic —– and along those lines, I’ve always been somewhat puzzled by the consensus that has Pearl Jam front-and-center on the grunge mantle. I’ve had talks with the members in which they themselves, specifically Gossard and McCready, explicitly calling out and putting down the band’s abilities as a live force. But i know ultimately the band itself has little to do with its public legacy and thus reliance, so more power to PJ doing a Who anthem.

    Bring it on.

  20. — I’m all for the sharing of lists

    Me too, and I am grateful for name/titles only, no Youtube links that would have slowed page-loads very quickly. I checked out most of the suggested songs. Jeff Beck’s instrumental was fantastic. As to Pearl Jam’s cover of The Who’s song, that’s one of the reasons why Ten is near the top of my all-time best rock albums list.

  21. the best covers reinvent the original and make it their own, often to the point of being unrecognizable. (Good bands will do this with their own songs after playing it 10+ years.) Some examples

    Johnny Cash – Hurt (Trent Reznor)
    El Perro Del Mar – Heavenly Arms (Lou Reed)
    U2 – Night and Day (Cole Porter)
    Duran Duran – Watching the Detectives (Elvis C)
    Happy Mondays – Stayin Alive (BeeGees)
    Bryan Ferry (or Talking Heads) – Take Me to the River
    The Rosebuds – Couldn’t Love You More (Sade)
    Bowie & Jagger – Dancing in the Street
    Au Revoir Simone – Fade Into You (Mazzy Star)
    Depeche Mode – Route 66
    anything Nouvelle Vague

    others too foggy to think of

  22. — I’ve had talks with the members in which they themselves, specifically Gossard and McCready

    Did they ever share thoughts with you about being part of MLB vs PJ? Without looking it up, I believe they were members of both bands. The sound is radically different, and I guess you can ascribe the contrast to Andrew Wood-led indie style vs Pearl Jam’s studio controlled output.

    As to Pearl Jam’s appeal, Ten is perfect, as far as I’m concerned, with regards to vocal and guitar raw passion. Vedder’s later work suffers, but Yellow Ledbetter is a fine song.

  23. they sure don’t extend their politics into what comes out of their headphones.

    very true, guilty as charged. hence depeche mode distancing themselves from richard spencer after he said they were his favorite band (something ol heartiste might agree with.)

    though my favorite musicians/songwriters are the ones with whom i seem to think similarly. their lyrics are usually the i most enjoy digging into

  24. — Au Revoir Simone – Fade Into You

    Listening to it now. Immediate impression: Mazzy Star’s original can’t be covered. A bit like how I described Kenny Roger’s “Lucille.” The cover might grow on me, who knows. They’re smart to take it in a different direction than the dreamy original.

  25. they’re smart to take it in a different direction than the dreamy original

    usually the only type of cover worthwhile IMO, with some exceptions. at least as far as anything more than a b-side. one of my most memorable adolescent memories was a fellow busrider’s impromptu performance of Hotel California, and it worked its magic arranged just as the original

  26. PA,

    Forgive me, but I don’t know what MLB is. A cursory Google search just brought up links about Vedder’s frequent sightings at Cubs games; I only knew of Temple of the Dog in terms of PJ antecedents, this grunge precursor “Hunted” I only learned of tonight.

    I recall my last phoner with PJ being with McCready, i’m almost sure; this was right after the time the band was doing a European tour of 30-some cites and releasing a concernt-length CD of each and every performance. Striking to me was McCready going out of his way, several times, to put down the band’s instrumental prowess on some of the performance discs.

    The gtroup was also melancholy at the time over a relatively recent incident, i think in Europe, in which several fans were trampled to death during their performance with the blame eventually going to the open-seating policy, in which general admission generated a rush-to-the-stage scenario that led to the stampede; i recall McCready spending a lot of time about that.

    On a lighter note, the band Creed was also huge at this time, a group that was widely thought to be a PJ emulator; I made some joke about Scott Stapp or whatever his name is, the lead singer of Creed, looking sorta like Vedder and Mccready was sort-of dry about that, not wanting to get into the joke of it….

    IDK, FWIW, i think Soundgarden is way, WAY better band is much more deserving of carrying the grunge torch; even Alice in Chains is a better instrumental band that PJ…. I do like that Temple of the Dog tune, “Say Hello to Heaven,” which i think is a tribute to Wood.

  27. MLB: Mother Love Bone. As I understand it, Vedder was scouted to replace the late Andrew Wood, and they changed the band’s name to Pearl Jam.

  28. PA, yes I do recall Urge Overkill’s cover of Girl, You’ll Be A Woman soon.

    Back when MTV showed music videos, once when that song came up, my dad was in the kitchen and said, “Hey, that’s a Neil Diamond song.”

    A while back, I heard a hauntingly sweet version of Bryan Adams’ “Heaven.” Not sure who sung it and haven’t been able to find it out ever since.

    Tori Amos did a sultry version of Bruce Springsteen’s “I’m On Fire”….wowza!

    Back when she was relevant, I thought Fiona Apple did a great version Hendrix’s “Angel”. Saw it on an Unplugged many a moon ago, back when they had Unplugged’s.

  29. Oh, and the ever terrific Johnny Cash covering NIN’s “Hurt.” That’s the only version I can listen to. So solid!

  30. “Say Hello to Heaven” is a great song. Never tire of it.

    “Rooster” is a beautiful tune. The intro guitar riff….sick, man, sick! My favorite Alice in Chains song, next to “Right Turn”, in which Chris Cornell makes a timely appearance at the end.

  31. RE. MLB>

    Ahh, yes, of course….. That was probably the most well-known precursor to PJ but in my advancing years I momentarily forgot.

    @Mendo: Agreed. I’d have to say Temple of the Dog and “Say Hello…” are my favorite PJ spinoff and specific single to date.

  32. — Waters without Gilmour turned out to be actually worse than Gilmour without Waters — and Gilmour without Waters isn’t much, IMO. (Mathew Walker)

    Yes. I liked Pink Floyd’s (without Waters) “Momentary Lapse of Reason” album when it came out in 1988 but it hasn’t aged well. There are no songs on it that I check out now, with one significant exception: the instrumental Terminal Frost. I had a SHORT POST about that piece last summer. His “Division Bell” album from 1994 was better. “Poles Apart” and “What Do You Want From Me” are great songs. There was a running theme of desire to reconcile with Waters in the album.

  33. The one Pink Floyd song I don’t hear nearly enough, that is an all-time favorite of mine is: “On The Turning Away”

    Think it’s time to listen to it again right now.

  34. The ultimate cover song for those of a certain age (a.k.a. old) was Manfred Mann’s cover of Springsteen’s “Blinded by the Light.” The song was unrecognizably transformed. And at the time the Mann song was a MONSTER hit, on the radio constantly, while Springsteen’s song had barely created a ripple three years earlier. It’s a great song too, the Mann version, especially the long version. Over the top, goofy, fun.

  35. I never heard Pearl Jam’s rendition of “Love Reign O’er Me,” but being a big Who fan I checked it out. For starters, it does nothing new musically. It’s almost a precise reconstruction. Then the singing started. When it got to the yelling parts — the “loooovvvvveeee” — I just burst out laughing. To my ears, Vedder’s singing sounds like someone imitating a man being eaten alive by a shark. Everything he touches strikes me as just a little bit ludicrous. Hence, I cannot stand Pearl Jam.

    But then, I feel the same, if not quite as intensely, about most grunge. It’s interesting how the music of an era not one’s own sometimes feels so jagged. I’m sure were I 10 or 12 years younger, I would have been all over grunge the way I was all over punk. But I hate it.

    Ok, not as much as I hate R&B, but I mean c’mon.

  36. The ultimate cover song for those of a certain age (a.k.a. old) was Manfred Mann’s cover of Springsteen’s “Blinded by the Light.”

    You mean the “ripped up like a douche” song? lol

  37. Off topic, but hey it is the day after.

    Ten minutes into the new Bill Burr, and he has already laid into Trump for being a racist, and about how we have the two worst choices for candidates. (It was filmed prior to the results.)

    But then he goes into a fat shaming bit, and slut shaming. And now his bit is about street shitting in India, and how that is shameworthy.

    So in other words, he is mining clearly and obviously minting the Sphere, but can’t move into the real. He is hardly even Alt Lite.

  38. I can hardly watch it, it is so obviously derived from the AR and the Sphere, but then watered down for a live audience.

    There is a larger point, about the limits of that medium of culture.

  39. The apocryphal story on that Mannfred Mann song is that the band members were adding the sibilant sh to the vocal track, for fun and as an inside joke, and that they decided to keep it in the final version.

    And the rest is history …

    Great lyrics though, courtesy of the Boss. How could he have been a faker and come up with lyrics like that?

  40. Vedder’s singing sounds like someone imitating a man being eaten alive by a shark.

    Hahaha

    Vedder was featured in the four-hour Tom Petty documentary on netflix, and in it on stage he is his very weird self. It is hard to see someone in such pain, but he found an appreciative audience.

  41. In that Petty documentary, Vedder is on stage with him doing one of his songs, and he does a pitch perfect vocal imitation of Petty, while they are on stage together. He mimics the vocal mannerisms freakishly accurate. And also does air guitar. On stage with Tom Petty, he is playing air guitar.

    One the one hand, he gets some allowances for being a suffering artist, but to many people I think the overall effect is uncomfortable.

  42. “One the one hand, he gets some allowances for being a suffering artist, but to many people I think the overall effect is uncomfortable.”

    Sort of like me. (i get the joke)

  43. “When it got to the yelling parts — the “loooovvvvveeee” — I just burst out laughing.” (ike)

    The song/cover, as nikcrit elucidated, inevitably brings very subjective (positive) moments in my life immediately to mind, so of course I’ll always be on favorable terms with it. That said, it would be difficult for me to laugh outright at a man who is ‘putting it all out there’ like that, especially vocally — regardless of how comical I may find it from varying standpoints. His chops there instill me with truly compassionate sensibilities, which is rather rare for me.

  44. Madeline Peyroux’s “Between the Bars,” covering that whiny bastard Elliot Smith(?), is easy on the ears as well.

  45. PA – My oldest son (10) recently started guitar lessons. His instructor asked him to bring a list of songs he’d like to learn to play. While I know plenty of great songs, I never learned guitar and I’m not familiar with what’s an initial list of cool songs he might realistically try to learn in his first year. Any suggestions?

  46. — Any suggestions?

    Greet question, and paradoxically I may be the right person to ask, because I am an “advanced beginner” myself. For someone starting out, I’d pick songs that have these three qualities:

    – he likes the song
    – it is slow to mid tempo
    – it has no complicated chords, including (1) no barre chords — that’s ones where the index finger presses on all the strings, while the other fingers press individual ones – or (2) chords that involve difficult finger positioning or rapid chord changes. The F chord is the most common barre chord. Early on, it’s best to stick with songs that have the common open chords: G, C, D, E, E minor, A, A minor. A vast majority of rock and country songs can be played with just those chords at least at a “dumbed down” version.

    The reason to stick with the easy chords is to build up the confidence. But a motivated boy learns voraciously and he may well be ready to learn the difficult stuff faster than expected

    So songs I’d recommend on their virtue of being easy for a beginner, and fun to play:

    – Pink Floyd “Wish You Were Here” (we’re talking chords – strumming – here, because notes – plucking – is a separate thing to master, and I think traditionally you learn to strum the chords before you learn the scales and notes.

    – Pink Floyd “Comfortably Numb” sounds complex in the recording, but its verses and chorus are very simple strumming chords

    – Any song with an A-D-E chord pattern (in any order) because those chords are very easy to skip between. Examples are many upon any. Just a few: “You Are My Sunshine,” or Waylon Jennings “Amanda,” or the cheery Dan Baird song “I Love You, Period”

    – Waylon Jennings “Luckenbach Texas,” but maybe that’s more for strumming at home because it’s so vocals-based, it needs to be sang while played.

    – Beatles “Let It Be” is very easy

    – Beatles “Hey Jude” – this one gets a bit more complicated, but still doable for a beginner.

    – John Denver “Country Roads” is challenging but doable at the beginner level.

    – Bob Seger’s “Still The Same”. Bonus on mastering the real, rather than the simplified opening chords. Cool, upbeat tune. It has the F barre chord, but those have to be learned at some point.

    – Eagles “Take It Easy”

    – Van Morrison “Brown Eyed Girl” can be played in a simplified version and still sounds good

    – Glen Campbell “Rhinestone Cowboy” is a stretch for a beginner, but doable once he is ready to pick up new chords.

    – Jimmy Buffet “Margaritaville” is among the easier to play on this list.

    The beginner’s big first hurdle is to strum clean and keep the rhythm (don’t pause while changing chords). That comes very quickly. Youtube has beginner tutorials for virtually every song ever recorded. Justin Sandercoe (JustinGuitar) is one of the best tutors.

  47. “Great lyrics though, courtesy of the Boss. How could he have been a faker and come up with lyrics like that?”

    He wasn’t a faker. Not back then. But he was a traitor to his roots — both his people and his band mates. And “surprisingly” in the years after that he was massively depressed, even suicidal. Well yeah Bruce, that’s what happens to traitors.

    Speaking of covers… the Sid Vicious “My Way” has to stand among the greats. And there’s The Flying Lizards version of “Money” and Devo doing “Satisfaction.” 80s!!!!

  48. I’ve played with the guys at camping trips (with another who also plays) or when my advanced-guitarist friend drops in. I strum rhythm chords, he plays the scales. Real songs or spontaneous stuff we make up. I once played “You are my sunshine” for mine and other kids at a party, changing the words to funny/favorite cartoon characters. “You are my angry bird, my only angry bird, pigs make me angry, when they steal eggs…”

    BTW, Johnny Cash does a great cover of that song.

    It’s also fun to play alone to relax or practice a new song. I’d love to do bar gigs but my singing ability will never be up to that level.

  49. The first hit on this search at yourube “john denver johnny cash country roads” is a somewhat obscure clip of those two doing that song.

    Johnny Boy Goldilocks had a god given voice that can’t be taught.

    I have said this exact same comment before, but it is easy to forget that John Denver circa 1975 or so, was a #1 world star, on the level of Michael Jackson ten years later. How quickly things change.

  50. Youtube is pushing hard their original youtube red series called Gigi Gorgeous, which is (apparently) about a teenage male to female transitioning.

    Wow is he ever bang-worthy, i guess trans-sexual confusion is a good thing!

  51. Old Rog was pretty messed up, in retrospect. But those records were and are truly great.

    Oh, and Nina Gordon, Straight Outta Compton.

  52. With all seriousness, watch the promo (for Gigi Gorgeous), and it is clear that such confusion is its aim.

    The confusion is deliberately grafted into the viewer’s brainstem: I’d do that, oh wait that’s a boy!

  53. Well, looking at the photos of when Gigi was still a boy you could’ve easily mistaken him for a girl even before any makeup or surgical work.

  54. O.T.,@PA, et.all,

    What do you think of the thrust of this story? Does Breitbart concoct and exaggerate? Or is it the truthful reflector of what msm big-west media obscure, cover-up and fabricate?

    Question; do you think it would be ‘noble’ for Breitbart or whatever counter-media to willingly fabricate with the goal of correcting the ‘lies’ of msn? Or is it always wrong to mislead or lie under the pretense of something being ‘news?’

    That’s what this story gets at—— and it’s depressing, the sense of disingenuous tit-for-tat, with each ‘side’ rationalizing their perfidy.And the same sort-of ‘anticipating-lies’ calculus has entered diplomatic relations between and among western allies.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/10/opinion/germanys-false-hopes-about-trump.html?ref=opinion .

  55. That’s what this story gets at—— and it’s depressing, the sense of disingenuous tit-for-tat, with each ‘side’ rationalizing their perfidy

    Last week PA told you we were effectively at the point of a civil war (in thought) but you completely pooh-poohed the idea. This is the kind of thing he’s talking about…

  56. That article is just typical NYT claptrap. She mentions ONE issue – immigration. Germany has a population of 80 million people, and this is the only pressing issue she can find to discuss within US-German relations? Really? She wrote a stupid article to say “I’m a globalist and Trump isn’t so I’m gonna cry about it.”

    Why doesn’t she address the fact that Angela Merkel is polling horribly in her own damn country and recently had to make the desperate public offer to pay immigrants up to 1,200 Euros each to return willingly?

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/germany-offer-asylum-seekers-1200-euros-voluntarily-return-home-countries-refugees-crisis-merkel-a7561701.html

    But such details don’t matter. Mr. Trump’s base and the news media he consumes believe that Europe is being overrun by violent Muslim refugees. “Do you still feel safe,” a woman asked me, “I mean, after letting all those Muslims in?”

    Maybe 3-5% of Trump’s voters have any inkling of what’s going on with European mass immigration right now, or even care. Bannon does. Miller does. But the 62 million who voted for Trump don’t give a rat’s ass about what is going on over there.

  57. True, Mr. Trump’s alt-right allegiance doesn’t preclude behind-the-scenes cooperation. But it does present severe limits to what can happen publicly. How would Mr. Trump explain to his voters that he is cooperating with Germany and Europe in sensitive fields such as national security — while in the minds of his supporters they are at the brink of chaos and civil war?

    LMAO. I don’t know where to even start with this above. ^^^^

    Exhibit A on why the NYT is fake news that keeps getting kicked out of pressers by Trump.

  58. And how else would one expect a globalist blog such as the NYT or The Economist to write about Trump or European populism, besides dropping innuendo about Breitbart’s credibility. Those are the same people (broadly speaking) who covered up Rotherham, suppress news about colored criminality, and in Germany imprison people who document immigrant misbehavior.

  59. And how else would one expect a globalist blog such as the NYT or The Economist to write about Trump or European populism, besides dropping innuendo about Breitbart’s credibility

    Exactly. Gotta set the stage with some “boogeyman” alarmism first. But she doesn’t understand that time is up on that kind of thing, worldwide.

    These people are completely obsessed with immigration. It’s unbelievable. And sickening.

    But they don’t know his supporters.

    LOL, and I’m sooooo sure that Anna has really gotten out there and talked to some Trump supporters rather than just, you know, the “undiverse” staffers they have there in the NYT newsroom. But even if she did, we know it would only yield 5-6 more articles about how she strayed down into flyover country and encountered gang after gang of KKK provocateurs waiting to pounce at each freeway exit outside the beltway.

  60. Cam, you’re answering your own questions again; i’m not talking about about the partisan loyalty itself being propositioned; just about this idea in which there is ‘no objective media’ anymore, and thus everyone’s justified in creating whatever level of accountabiliy they feel like, in terms of the stories;

    Do you feel Breitbart is a reliable media source?

  61. “Those are the same people (broadly speaking) who covered up Rotherham, suppress news about colored criminality, and in Germany imprison people who document immigrant misbehavior.”

    Well, it gets complicated, because I can easily imagine some news events leading to your above ‘rough take’ and see m yself saying “right on.”

    But then there was Brooks, who you called a globalist elite frightened of getting obliterated, etc., but who wrote that impressive column on the dynamic between Trump and his appeal and his deference to the specific ideology of Bannon. Brooks went on to laud the power, passion and timeliness of Trump and Bannon’s nationalism and went on to specifically criticize how globalism sentiment, economies and cultures are bloodless and lack the civic passion that various strains of nationalism can arise.

    You, PA, got this soldier-like quality in which you exaggerate your titular ideological opponent or even ‘enemy’ for the sake of combat and, perhaps moreso, the pitch of your own fervor. I imagine it depresses you greatly to so ideological allies express universalist strains in even seemingly innocuous ways like music taste or even food preferences.

    Not everyone is so fiercely partisan, whether for quantitative or qualitative distinctions. Just because I’m a physical hybrid and have loyalities and sympathies across racial divides doesn’t mean that i’m passionless or incapable of impassioned ethnic sentiment.

    In today’s case, you took an argument for a call for relative uniform accountable press and turned it into a white-vs-NAM, globalist-vs-nationalist cultural and economic crusade position.

  62. Cam, you’re answering your own questions again; i’m not talking about about the partisan loyalty itself being propositioned; just about this idea in which there is ‘no objective media’ anymore, and thus everyone’s justified in creating whatever level of accountabiliy they feel like, in terms of the stories;

    Do you feel Breitbart is a reliable media source?

    Ok, I see. Good question. Media merged with politics long ago. So yes, the media is busted. American journalism is effectively dead once an issue gets past a certain size or relevance to national/world politics.

    I’d never read Breitbart (or Fox) without reading what the opposite side (MSNBC or CNN) said about the same topic.

    But in this case I don’t think she’s so much making up “fake news” or “non-objective realities” as much as she’s putting out a specific (and blatant) political piece. That’s all this is. Here she is simply functioning as a wing of the Democratic Party.

    The idea that the relations between two powerful countries (of 400+ million in population between the two of them) should all hinge so critically on this one small issue of Middle Eastern migrants is simply beyond comprehension. The fact that she does not instantly see that herself before hitting “send” is both laughable and alarming – but what can you expect when the “conservatives” on staff at the NYT are people like Brooks or Kristof….

  63. ” That said, it would be difficult for me to laugh outright at a man who is ‘putting it all out there’ like that, especially vocally — regardless of how comical I may find it from varying standpoints. His chops there instill me with truly compassionate sensibilities, which is rather rare for me.”

    Yeah, i totally agree with that and believe I sensed as much when i was a teenager first playing in bands. I too was a much better player than singer and felt very vulnerable singing a lead vocal and fronting the act and its moment.

    And in informal jams or open-mikes, where you’d encounter someone you may or may not know but who is doing something that is very different than their community role as father or teacher or businessman or whatever and he gives it a go and pours his heart into this until-then private passion and talent, well, you can’t really feel anything more beyond the respect y one gives for that.

    I recall the humbling, overwhelming feeling i felt myself meeting that challenge as a kid, even in terms of just playing an instrument with passion before strangers or, possibly even more nervewracking, familiar strangers like classmates and neighbors you know but don’t have any active relationship with. That is putting it out there and there’s a certain ring of confidence and winning comportment one can brandish upon meeting that challenge successfully and moving forward.

  64. I thought that picture was of a dude, and he was being referred to as she out of convention; but that is not the case.

    Her name is Halley Bass. Hmmm …

    She faces up to 93 days in jail and/or a $500 fine.

    Bass and her Ann Arbor-based attorney, Douglas Mullkoff, requested that she be sentenced through the 15th District’s mental health court. Hines said if court officials determine Bass is eligible, Bass will be sentenced by Judge Karen Valvo

    Judge Valvo, presiding over mental court and the women’s issues.

    Since when is mental health court a thing? Drug court has been around for awhile, but mental health court is certain to be an even more popular choice.

    A lot of resources went into investigating her false allegations, certainly more than can be covered with 500 dollars.

  65. Realistically what can be said about women who look like that. How is it that there are so many of them?

    I think that in the old days and out on the prairie that such women were an asset, not just that there was more of them and had the reduced surface area to mass ratio that is advantageous to large mammals in colder climes, but that her body could be used to warm up next with to, and also just generally large and strong hands.

  66. I think that in the old days and out on the prairie that such women were an asset, not just that there was more of them and had the reduced surface area to mass ratio that is advantageous to large mammals in colder climes, but that her body could be used to warm up next with to, and also just generally large and strong hands.

    She’s got the rotund endotherm-friendly body of an eskimo, yes.

    But that’s just due to a soft, effete life of no physical challenge or stress. Out on the prairie 100+ years ago she would’ve been much tougher, skinnier and weather-worn.

  67. Remember the Epic Hungarian Driver? Here he’s speaking with a friendly media host (imagine that) about the incident and the consequences. He got a suspended 1.5-year prison sentence and was fired from his job (he’s since got another one) for veering his truck into the migrants. He speaks out for the truckers who have been victimized on the Calais route, and says that David Cameron himself saw the original video, and changes were made as a result of it.

    In the original post I quoted an imaginary reader seeing a free country and saying “I want that!” Here is an example of that.

    Epic Hungarian Truck Driver Interview:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKscHiQUarI .

  68. — You, PA, got this soldier-like quality in which you exaggerate your titular ideological opponent or even ‘enemy’ for the sake of combat and, perhaps moreso, the pitch of your own fervor. (Nikcrit)

    Way overstated, but I’ll take it. Nonetheless, you bring up a point worth responding to: in dismissing NYT editorials, am I being willfully anti-intellectual, and in my role here is it something I shouldn’t be doing? I do see the value of reading and parsing globalist media outlets, and Steve Sailer is someone who does this regularly, and he does it well.

    For my part, picture my relationship with establishment media analogously to that of a man dealing with his hostile ex-wife at a settlement hearing. I see that she’s talking, I hear her words, but I know that every syllable she utters is a means to an end, the end being her gain at my impoverishment. I don’t care what she says (I’m letting my lawyer deal with that), I just want her out of my life.

  69. A 1.5 year sentence? Really? Wow.. .

    You gotta understand, when I debate, defend and analyze these news incidents on the cultural confrontation vanguard, I’m coming from a Williams country vantage point, where all the players concede ” greater good” limits on their unilateral powers to act on their judgments. That’s a reflexive habit but I do realize these acts are measured very differently in terms of import and actionability in other locales.

    And that can make all the difference in the world in terms of making a final judgement that’s rarely called upon here in our particular forum; i.e., all my blasphemies here come with total impunity! Lol!!

  70. Suspended sentence. He didn’t hit any of the migrants, just scattered them. If you watch the video, he explains how the truck camera vantage point misleads the viewer on the perception of speed and proximity. He also pointed to the stacked mound of bottles that they pile up to hit the trucks in order to get them to stop, and says that he was running that mound over. He makes a lot of good points about the Calais corridor, about how the fact that (1) the truckers are responsible for their cargo and (2) it’s all insured anyway, so nether the seller nor the recipient cares about it, but the burden is still on the trucker to safe-keep it, even as migrants climb on the trucks and cut the canvas to steal it. I don’t know what you mean by “greater good” but watching that interview, it felt like watching scene from a free country.

  71. OT/ of possible interest to readers. I live in a vibrant part of the city that is rapidly gentrifying with white eloi hipsters displacing the older multicult residents. Half the shop signs are in languages other than English. A gourmet burger joint opened a couple years ago in the main street with a video game/1950s aesthetic and is now the symbolic hub of the new white influx.

    In the last few weeks this burger place has had bricks thrown through its windows and anti-hipster graffiti written on its walls, which received lots of air in local media/sparked a “debate” about gentrification. The owners send their kids to the local public school and are good liberals in every way, shocked that anyone could think they are trying to harm the area.

    Today I saw a group of about twenty members of a hard-core all-white semi-criminal bikie gang eating lunch there consipicuously sitting in the outdoor area with their bikes taking all the parking. It’s unlikely the bikers are unaware of the press coverage of this place. An implicit white alliance like this is probably too much to hope for at this point, but it looks interesting.

  72. That might be half the problem, women like her are not getting enough exercise. She would probably be a totally different person if she got a lot of physical activity. Masculine women who are very active seem much happier than those who are not.

  73. This site really slows down when they are a lot of comments. I have had trouble commenting for the last two days.

  74. I’m sort of getting to the point that PA is at. Most of our opponents are not worth dealing with. Of course there are exceptions, but not many. They feel the same way about us. I have people who will not talk to me due to my support of Trump.

  75. lara, are the people who have shunned you explaining their actions? Or are they just dismissing you out of hand after you acknowledge who you voted for?

    I haven’t seen that level of contempt, but I sense it’s there if it was tested or rather ‘allowed’ to manifest, you might say.

    Most of the adults i’m around during weekdays are public-ed professionals, so they of course don’t like Trump for the very core existential threat he and his policies represent. Still, many of them have been down this road before and understand it’s just yet another episode of “Team Blue-vs-Team Red” same-old same-old.

  76. This group of older women I was in the same room with, there was about six of them, was going on and on (and on and on) about Trump and “racism” and “sexism”.

    I just reminded myself that talking with them would only be a frustrating experience, and inherently demeaning.

    I might have said “Girls come on, no politics please.” That would have been the maximum allowable without the next step which would have been unpleasantness.

    But the cliche of it all, these older very white women in this very white suburban environ, complaining about Trump and (literal quotes) “racism” and “sexism”. They couldn’t even come up with anything more original than that.

    The commenter I follow on Clusterfuck once asked a woman commenter there, if she ever loved a man, even her father? and of course that is the question that gets to it. These women somewhere along the line didn’t get the structure that they need, and they resent it to no end.

  77. I think that none of us has gotten the structure that we need.

    But something about how this structureless chaos in which we find ourselves, plays out in the lives of women, is just “too much.”

    It’s all too much. At least white men have the decency to kill themselves.

  78. Nikcrit,
    I have a cousin who campaigned for Hillary Clinton. He is a SJW, although by no means the worst one. He was cold to me last time we were at a family gathering. Granted, we have never been close , so it really wasn’t all that different than before. He also does not have the best social skills. His political views are central to his identity. I was advised to say “hi” and leave it at that. We are still friends on Facebook. I don’t get political on there, though.

  79. “At least white men have the decency to kill themselves.”

    Obviously that is a joke: it’s funny because it’s true.

    The women whose lives get pointless and frustrating and full of run-on unsatisfying days don’t know how to do anything but project that outward and onto the world.

    Men project that frustration and failure internally.

  80. Honestly, if he had better social skills I would have considered voting the way he wanted me to. Hillary really did not have the most likable people campaigning for her.

  81. OT@Cam:

    Just watch after tomorrow: the annual Duke conspiracy commences, with NCAA committee, the color and playby play commentariat and NCAA referees coalescing in the goal of pushing their too brand product onto the Final Four victory trophy podium.
    It actually commenced today with atrocious officiating in the last ten minutes if the UBC vs Duke tourney game. Fukin’ outrageous!

  82. Unbelievable fake news from the NYT:

    Every president lets go of US attorneys since Clinton fired 93 of 94 during his first stint in office. They’re political appointees.

    But never let a chance to bash Trump to to waste…

  83. The Egregious Fake News raises questions. One, do the over-120 IQ readers of that newspaper understand that the “abrupt” firings are routine with each change in administration? If they do, does it affect their stance toward NYTs as a credible (in their eyes) news organization? Or have we truly moved to the point where there is no pretense of objectivity, it’s all flag-waving now?

    That’s what I meant upstream, with globalist papers like NYT or the Economist being irrelevant and for me at least, not worth paying attention to. What’s the difference between a so-called newspaper of record deigning to make a statement of fact, vs say, Trigglypuff, when they essentially say the same thing each time?

    Also in the news today, “Erdogan Calls Dutch ‘Nazi Remnants’ After Turkish Minister Is Barred.” If they’re gonna call the most liberal country in the EU “nazi,” then why not actually go ahead and start gassing the unwanted residents of your country?

  84. I saw the cable-news reports, via fox and msnbc, on the AG firiings; what I gathered and remember from the story: correspondents on both stations pointedly mentioned that such firings were common during changes in potus administrations, especially of course when said change included a change in ruling party.

    Both stations also noted that it was claimed by the NY attorney general that Bharara said he had met with Trump officials shortly after the inauguration and that he was told they wanted him to stay in place with his duties during the new administration.

    then the two stations parted in their trajectory of covereage: FOX didn’t elaborate, while MSNBC interviewed associates of Gharara, to provide color re. his personality.

  85. Heartiste writes over at Gab.ai:

    Propaganda is like hypnotism. The totally unwilling can’t be put under its spell. There has to be an element of receptiveness in the target audience for their minds to be quasi-commandeered.

    Anti-White propaganda is powerful in part because a lot of its audience craves its cognitive crush.

    This goes some ways toward understanding the media’s hold on some who ought to know better by the mere virtue of their IQ, as well as its ineffectiveness on us.

  86. Here in a nutshell is what happens:

    Obama upon entering office in ’08 fires the leftover AG-staff associates from GWB; it’s duly noted in nytimes which, perhaps in deference to its lib bent, brandishes a bit of gusto in the perfunctory news account about the firings.

    Eight years later, shortly after his inauguration Trump fires the remaining Justice Dept. attorneys hired under Obama’s reign, and that same nytimes.com reports it; given that same lib bent that led to gusto eight years ago today the news they report comes with a tone that hints at manufactured angst——and two blog partisans of a far-right penchant go into “OMG, fake news!” mode.

    But where is the fake news? The nytimes, as well as the more liberal cable-news stations, report the story, DULY NOTE THAT SUCH FIRINGS EARLY INTO A NEW ADMINISTRATION ARE BUSINESS AS USUAL, and then both the token-right and token-left big-media vessels each put a bit of conceited and reifying spin on their overall straight-up news stories.

    The deceit in this instance, here at this blog, is in Cam’s disingenuousness and mock-indignation over the tone of this rote, biz-as-usual news story; PA, whose sympathetic to Cam’s politics and so signs-on to his misinterpretation of the nytimes story, joins in the alt-right groupthink.

    Fine, it’s a partisan blog —– but this exemplifies much of the partisan debate and ‘controversey’—— i.e., it exists because the participants wouldn’t have it any other way.

    But the relevant facts remain: the story by both center-left and center-right media was accurately reported; the over-reaction and womanly hysteria comes from far-left and far-right partisans.

    Everybody’s so fukin’ persecuted and oppressed in this country; personally, I feel the most egregioius bias and abuse of power will commence tomorrow when the Brackets are revealed and Duke once again will again have secured a mysteriously over-favored placement.

  87. So you don’t see NYT and other media sensationalizing it for effect, along with misrepresenting (by suggestion) the firings as some unusual abuse of power.

  88. @PA,

    Yes, for the most part i think it was a straight-up news report—– within the general partisan bias you get from newspapers of lore (i.e., The Times, Wapo and other papers are of a leftist bent, while Dallas Morning News, Arizona Republic, etc., are center-right editorially).

    In the case of the nytimes story on today’s matter, here are the paragraphs that i think are key in legitimizing it:

    ” It is not unusual for a new president to replace United States attorneys appointed by a predecessor, especially when there has been a change in which party controls the White House.

    Still, other presidents have done it gradually in order to minimize disruption, giving those asked to resign more time to make the transition while keeping some inherited prosecutors in place, as it had appeared Mr. Trump would do with Mr. Bharara. Mr. Obama, for example, kept Mr. Rosenstein, who had been appointed by George W. Bush.”

    However, the part of the story that most supports your hunch or claim is the times piece quoting Hannity’s bit about advising Trump to clear house; that is pure speculation of two entirely disconnected facts and that is a no-no in terms of traditional newsgathering in daily print press; in fact, that pure conjecture of disconnected events, regardless of how feasible the hypothetical supposition, is nonetheless tabloid-esque and is a hardcore violation of ethical newsgathering; i.e, that bit needed a ‘he said/she said’ connecting Hannity’s advice to Trump’s ear, which was not there.

    In my comment above, i was basically vouchproofing the FOX and CNN cable-news reports i watched; having re-read the nytimes piece, this time more closely, i see it’s a bit more than a straight up news bit with a bit of partisan heft; it in fact, goes into other news stories and then tries to apply them to even more conjecture. So i guess you have a point but i’d stand by the facts conveyed in my above quote from the story.

    I’m not trying to high-horse my way through this subject, but all this partisan bitching is tiring enough; no need to make shit up or intentionally misread or omit clarifying points for the sake of registering one’s partisan dissent; at this late date, all that is merely presumed.

  89. Nik – it’s the sensational Headline, mainly. Plus, these prosecutors did get some time since they knew they would be removed – the inauguration was Jan 20, right?

    With these newspapers that are overtly hostile to Trump it’s mainly the headline that is manipulated in a way that is simply radically different than under any President. The WaPo ran a story on “mass resignations at the State Department” in February before later (in the article) acknowledging that “it’s customary for such political appointees to be removed” by a new President.

    Do you think we’d see a similar headline for anything Obama did, even if “abruptly”? Simply never would’ve happened.

    And the absolutely unnecessary and sleazy mention of Hannity, which you referenced.

  90. Saint John’s College in Santa Fe starts a new study group on “the depravity of whiteness”. The study group’s stated goal is to examine “those who most often exhibit racist and sexist behavior—white males.”

    http://www.campusreform.org/?ID=8845

    Screenshots of the email sent to entire campus to announce the group:

  91. Camlost: strange about that St John’s college email. I wonder if this was initiated by some mid-level mystery-meat female SJW on staff. The lurid language hints at hysterical unprofessionalism. The college is very expensive, and its student are best described as “upper class granola.” No reference to this email on their web site.

    Its Maryland campus, which I am very familiar with, is one of the oldest colleges in the United States. The interesting thing about St. John’s College is that it sets itself apart for its Western Great Books, seminar-based classical liberal arts approach. They have kept with the traditional canon and resisted various feminist and multiculturalist fads over the decades. Below is the college’s list of their freshman first-semester reading:

    Heidegger: Being and Time
    Design and Expression in the Visual Arts
    Joyce: Ulysses
    Saussure: Course in General Linguistics
    Readings in Lao Tsu and Confucius
    Aristotle: Metaphysics
    Darwin: Natural Selection
    Plato: Republic
    Marquez: One Hundred Years of Solitude
    Galileo: Dialogues on the Two Chief World Systems
    Shakespeare: Selected Plays
    Metaphysical Poets
    Bosch and Bruegel
    Kant: Critique of Judgment
    Hobbes: Leviathan
    Augustine: City of God
    Austen: Selected Novels
    Faraday: Experimental Researches in Electricity and Magnetism
    Ethical Problems in Medicine
    Thucydides: The Peloponnesian War

  92. Nikcrit, that Australian aborigine genetics study article reads very straightforwardly to me. Not my area of familiarity, but it seems to keep with the conventional understanding of prehistoric migrations patterns in that part of the world.

  93. There is NO WAY that ANYONE can begin to process much less digest more than a handful of those books, over the course of one semester.

    Across the banner of their website are portraits of four of those authors: Austen, Plato, Confucius, and Homer.

    **********

    There is a St John’s University in Saint Paul that is a liberal arts Catholic school with a respected football team. I don’t know how well they balance their “need” for black footballers with their good-white and otherwise diverse “student body.”

    This St John’s is apparently not connected with that St John’s.

  94. The notion that anyone can read and process that reading list, and then to think that we are talking about incoming freshman in America in 2017, is frankly comical.

    That sort of “education” is the aspirational ideal that was come up with for 18th Virginia aristocrats, and most of them wouldn’t have qualified for it neither.

    But now everyone should go to college, because we are all going to be enlightened philosophers?

    It is a serious disconnect. Most most most most most most most most most most most most most most most most most most people are suitable for eating and pooping, and they don’t even do that very well.

  95. I am overwhelmed with cynicism and despair, about the inevitable and transpiring ecocide.

    And the alt-right’s solution is rah-rah Trump’s infrastructure plan?

    In other words, that is not a long-term solution.

  96. But of course lamenting ecocide is all hippy dippy leftist tree hugging faggotry, and has no place in the go go get em tiger AR.

    Elk, do you believe that the AltRight is agnostic or indifferent on the matter of landscape & environment, or that we’re actively hostile to its health?

  97. “How Did Aboriginal Australians Arrive on the Continent? DNA Helps Solve a Mystery?”

    Without checking out the link, my comment is that that topic is the most politicized topic there is, and it is also one that everyone has an interest in.

    (The topic that everyone is most interested in, is the race history of the world, that spans prehistory and history and current events.)

    And it is the one topic that is most constrained by politics: which is co-incidental: both those things are part of the same larger thing: which is the competition between and among groups for fitness and success and dominance.

    It is a goofy situation where we want to talk about our past and future, but we want to leave out the essential part of it because niceness. (fucking humans)

    Aboriginal Australians are the remnants of an archaic hominid that got mixed in to varying degrees throughout SE Asia, and the more SE the more mixed, so that those Abos are the most whatever-they’re-called. (Denisovans)

    That same dynamic is the story of India.

    https://redice.tv/radio-3fourteen/a-sikh-perspective-on-the-alt-right

    This link is a conversation at Red Ice between rocking hot babe Lana Russian-last-name and some honorary nearly White Sikh, who gives a humorous view on the ground about what it’s like to be woke upper caste nearly white Asian in the current dogma.

  98. Remember my recent post “The Lowest of Gutter Trash?” well, I just witnessed an example of this. I wish that little boy’s mother an agonizing death of cancer.

  99. Elk, do you believe that the AltRight is agnostic or indifferent on the matter of landscape & environment, or that we’re actively hostile to its health?

    Thanks for asking. The Alt Right is nebulous, and who gets to say what it is, right?

    My straightforward answer to your question, is that the AR would like to include within its essential platform, its concerns for the Earth, but that that question-and-or-problem is relegated to the back burner because of its difficulty.

    The easy answer to our problems is Progress and War. Those are the easy answers, and they are short-term solutions. Or middle-term solutions at best.

    People don’t want to live in an industrial hellscape, but somehow there is an advantage in the exploitation of energy: as I like to put it: He who takes advantage, has advantage.

    So therefore the Earth gets mined of its resources.

  100. Yesterday at Prolemart, in a quest to level up I said to the cashier who was a solid six, there’s a piece of tape stuck on your arm there. (which there was)

    She answers that it is a skin tone complexion test, for some make-up kit.

    “You’re white that’s all that matters.” Laughs from the audience.

  101. That reminded me of an anti-miscegenation meme from Twitter: “If you’re White, there is no upgrade. Don’t mix.”

  102. “Do you think we’d see a similar headline for anything Obama did, even if “abruptly”? Simply never would’ve happened.”

    Yes, if the paper in question were one of the traditionally center-right ones editorially, i.e., Chicago Tribune, Arizona Republic, Dallas Morning News; not in nytimes or Wapo or Sun Times, etc.

    Which raises another point; nytimes and wsj.com are only real national national papers of substance, and while nytimes is leftist-centered paper in general, wsj.com is too when it comes to its editorial page, for the most part….. so you do have the imbalance of center-left reppin’ the limited ‘national paper’ media space. IDK; I just think it’d be ironic for the right to take on the left’s hyperwhiney sense of persecution, though what will be will be……..

    Still, i see this afternoon’s Bracket unveiling will commence the REAL media conspiracy —– the DUKE conspiracy.

    Fuck Coach K Today!!!….. lol!!

  103. Cam: I know you don’t care but what do you think of the bracket breakdown? I’m liking the fantasy of the possible second-round MU upset over Duke.

    I know, indulgence of pure fantasia —– but I admittedly am still livid over that Wis-Duke final two years ago in which the outright scandalous officiating delivered the victor’s podium and trophy to Duke again.

    I’ve watched replays of that final ten minutes three or four times and I am increasingly convinced of conspiracy, whether or overt or subliminal on the part of referees and higher-up NCAA officials; i want an independent investigation of coach K, his boosters ——-and his justice dept. stooges! lol!!

  104. Cam: I know you don’t care but what do you think of the bracket breakdown? I’m liking the fantasy of the possible second-round MU upset over Duke.

    Oh, I care plenty.

    Yeah, Duke’s not popular with the other ACC fandoms, for a myriad of reasons. The old ACC tobacco road core fans (like me) aren’t fond of Duke in general because their student population is all from Jersey and similar places, and they act like pompous yankee jackasses.

    And I know the common mantra is that Duke “gets all of the calls” and I don’t necessarily disagree. But you’ve got to remember just how good their players are – they’re getting a top 3 recruiting class every year. They’ve got as many as 4 first round picks right now. Their players are so good that they’ve even had bench guys like Josh McRoberts go on to long NBA careers.

    So, when they pull out a lot of close games there’s a reason having to do with talent more than possible bias. having 7 McDonald’s all-americans on your team makes all the difference.

    Besides, for the first half of my life Duke couldn’t win jack squat – they’d go to the final our quite often but didn’t break through and actually win the title until their 6th or 7th visit to the final four, IIRC. So, seeing them high and mighty now is not a big deal to a lot of old ACC fans like me.

  105. Environmentalism is a dead issue, with 7 billion minos on Earth today.

    It is a non-starter. There can be no environmentalism and multicult both. There are simply too many eaters. It is closely tied to the overpopulation problem.

  106. @ Nik – take a close look at Duke one more time, in all fairness they did beat 13 teams in the top 50.

    In contrast, the Badgers were 6-5 against top 50 teams. But if you’re a betting man you can get 80/1 on the Badgers to win it all at this point. You should put $25 on that.

  107. Mannish hate hoax girl would have been a content, hard working house or farm wife and a credit to her family just a while ago.

    The main social problem might be sending everyone off to university for atomization rather than pressuring them into getting married in the local community. The meaningless or malicious crap some of them then (pay to) learn is just the cherry on top of that life derailment.

  108. The two 30 for 30’s about Duke were the best.

    The one was about Christian Laettner and “the Shot” and the other of course about the rape scandal hoax. (Crystal Mangum had a promising career ahead of her, she just fell in with a bad crowd.)

    I lived in the South my whole life, except four years at Duke …

    Christian Laettner comes across as a very well balanced man — the ultimate Chad. Part of the controversy around him was his supposed homo-erotic friendship with another (black) player. Which now seems anachronistic — now such a suspicious friendship would be celebrated by the team and the administration and proof that white players are an asset.

    Duke and Laettner or someone like him and prior — Danny Ferry perhaps? — is largely sourced as the inspiration for Tom Wolfe’s Charlotte Simmons team and its hero Jojo Johanssen.

  109. Danny Ferry had a little racial “incident” while doing a great job as General Manager of the Atlanta Hawks:

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/sports/nba/hawks/2014/09/12/danny-ferry-indefinite-leave-of-absence-atlanta-racist-scouting-report/15527829/

    On a conference call to discuss possible free agents he said that one player “has some African in him” as a way of saying the player is unreliable. He claimed that the remarks were given to him just like that and he read them straightaway, but it was a big hubbub.

  110. “But if you’re a betting man you can get 80/1 on the Badgers to win it all at this point.”

    Wonder what the return would be on taking Marquette over Duke in the likely second-round tournament game?

    Re. Laetner and the 30-30 episodes covering Duke of lore; I like those expositions of Christian and Danny, etc.; good stuff.

    No, my Duke wrath and ranting is reserved for one person: Coach K; the king of mediated sanctimony and piety; never seen a bigger attention-whoring publicity hound who bends over background to portray himself as the opposite. it’s not just the egomania; i expect that in just about any celebrated figure who routinely interacts with the press; it’s this mealy-mouthed pretense to the contrary, etc.

    God, what a loathsome creature he is.

  111. The Duke Lacrosse rape hoax is the most perfect custom made red-pill that exists in the world, and the fact that Jackie Coakley and Haven Monahan had their controversially disputed love affair it all come undone, goes to show something is seriously wrong.

    The Narrative gets proved false, again and again and again and again and again and again, and that doesn’t change a thing.

    Analysis on the meta of that has been done, and it is not that complicated. That the Narrative is false thus requires more fervent belief and submission as after all it is subservience that counts.

  112. Wonder what the return would be on taking Marquette over Duke in the likely second-round tournament game?

    In a 2nd rd matchup between Duke and Marquette I would guess that you’d basically get around 3-2 odds for Marquette to beat Duke straight up. (that would be +150, meaning bet $100 to win $150)

    At best it will be 3.5 to 2.

  113. “Environmentalism is a dead issue, with 7 billion minos on Earth today.”

    True. The only people who give a hoot about the environment are whites, and maybe Japanese. Nobody else cares. The biggest threat to the environment — in the U.S. and Europe — is immigration. No, scratch that. The ten biggest threats are immigration. All else pales, because America and Europe had essentially solved their environmental problems, otherwise. Well, also — ironically — environmentalism is a threat, as it gives us insane windmill farms that chop up birds and bats by the millions so we can preen, “Look! Four percent of our energy comes from wind!”

    On a global scale, it’s China and all that it represents. But of course, a lot of what (((Americans))) have done in the last thirty years is outsource our pollution to China. Why pay all that money to build a factory in America that needs to watch its pollution? Just go to China and have at it, while you sit in America with a native workforce that spends its time creating race-mixing and pro-immigration ads to sell your Chinese made products.

    Isn’t globalism wonderful? Everybody wins! Except the earth, and white people.

  114. “The Narrative gets proved false, again and again and again and again and again and again, and that doesn’t change a thing……it thus requires more fervent belief and submission as after all it is subservience that counts.”

    I’d say that is close but that I slightly disagree: its pursuit in the face of given failure over and over and over is because the narrative is more a holy grail than a practically sought-after destination.

    It’s the dream of a holy grail that keeps that subservience fortifying, no?

  115. “At best it will be 3.5 to 2.”

    Really? I was casually thinking the return would be something along the lines of what you said would pay out if one took UW to win the entire tournament.

    I’m clearly a novice about betting and books and odds; but I’m assuming that the fact that Wisconsin would have to win, what, four consecutive times against favored teams thus makes the odds and thus payout so much more massive than if MU manages to pull off a upset in one single game, albeit a massive upset that would be.

    To,me, the world of probabilities and gambling and odds analysis and the reality of such a massive industry is fascinating, though i’d never partake on a big, dispassionate level; i’m too emotional and ‘hometown-ish’ a bettor; petty wagering, for me, is basically a distraction to keep from other, umm, forms of vice. However, through my former line of work i’ve come into contact with characters who were known to make a full-time living off of their gambling, though it seemed plenty of other avenues of turmoil made it into their lives.

    I just can’t much fathom the idea personally.

  116. I’m clearly a novice about betting and books and odds; but I’m assuming that the fact that Wisconsin would have to win, what, four consecutive times against favored teams thus makes the odds and thus payout so much more massive than if MU manages to pull off a upset in one single game, albeit a massive upset that would be.

    Exactly. One game vs. 6 wins needed to win the whole NCAA tourney.

    To win it all, even Duke pays 5-1 if you bet now. UNC is 13-2 and Villanova 7-1.

    You can maybe get 8-to-1 odds on the underdog in a single match if Floyd Mayweather comes back and fights some journeyman or washed up pro.

    Last year Leicester City won the English Premier League in soccer (over the household names like Chelsea, Manchester U, Arsenal, etc.) That paid 5,000 to 1. That’s like betting on the Jacksonville Jaguars winning the Super Bowl next year.

    For those people that owned those 5,000 to 1 tickets on Leicester City last year they were all contacted by the casinos who offered them early buyouts at 2,500 or 3,000 to 1, but before Leicester City had actually clinched the championship. I don’t think a single person took the early payout.

  117. Each year I enter one of those free March Madness bracket things. Remember the one where Yahoo was offering a billion dollars? Of course I’m usually out by day one. Though for that billion deal, I actually had all wins the first day! But immediately lost the next day.

    I generally go with mostly favorites, but throw in a few long shots. Then you have to think, if I pick a 12 spot to win the first round, do I keep them alive? Anyway, I know nothing about college ball anymore (I was a big follower back in the 80s when the Big East was a dominant league — the Patrick Ewing G’Town days when John Thompson had his team playing ghetto thug ball), and the odds are astronomical, but hey, maybe the gods will smile on me one year.

    Though honestly this year, I don’t even know if the thing has started yet or not.

  118. http://andrewbartlett.com/sustainable-transport-rally-–-“we-can’t-get-much-more-car-friendly-than-this”/

    –thordaddy
    18 FEBRUARY, 2007 AT 6:15 AM
    Mr. Bartlett,

    If Western Nations, including Australia, are seriously concerned about emissions then a halt to immigration would insure a guaranteed reduction in emissions. Not only would there be less CO2 emissions from less people, but there would most likely be a reduction in transport use (cars, buses, etc.) with a corresponding increase in low-emission cars due to a lower tax burden on the people of Australia and elsewhere.

    –thordaddy
    18 FEBRUARY, 2007 AT 8:47 AM
    Mr. Bartlett,

    There would be 2 additional effects stemming from a halt in immigration that those who are serious about man-made global warming would appreciate.

    First, a halt in immigration would give a truer picture of Australia’s responsibility in contributing to man-made global warming.

    Secondly, a halt in immigration would reverse the dilution of a truer Australian voice in doing what she was obligated to do to combat man-made global warming assuming she viewed it as dire a scenario as our elites proclaim.

    I am curious to see if those that are proclaiming seriousness about man-made global warming are willing to make some ideological sacrifices that they expect of others.

  119. I’m guessing that Trump is welcoming ‘March Madness” to obscure all the political madness unleashed the last few weeks.

    At the rate he’s going, Trump may very well galvanize the far left into coalition with cuck right and anything on either side within conceivable proximity to the center. I don’t think i’ve ever seen a politician toss so much political capital into the toilet so quickly.

    It’s bizarre.

  120. — i’ve ever seen a politician toss so much political capital into the toilet

    The media and the federal bureaucracy despise him and nothing he could have done differently would have changed their vitriol toward him. You don’t see that?

  121. “The media and the federal bureaucracy despise him and nothing he could have done differently would have changed their vitriol toward him.”

    No, that is bullshit IMO. And to the extent it’s partially true, it is little more than blowing smoke.

    To wit: had the press up til now just been hostile and cynical, he could have alleviated much of that by quick, decisive, prudent and wise presidential conduct: shut his trap, get his agenda moving, caucus with his party and align pledged statements and votes with behind-the-scenes planks and coalitions.

    Among the things NOT TO DO during such a presidential junction is: not act like a petty and deluded infant, like calling for a ‘white house investigation on the weekend to probe into supposedly faulty crowd estimates by cable-news stations over how many people attended Donald Trump’s inauguration.

    And now he realizes the consequences are worse when you make self-serving lies about your political adversary; i.e., his claim that Obama wiretapped him. You can see in his eyes, his current fear to confront the press, that he doesn’t know what to do now; tons of money is being wasted investigating this complete non-issue and his own party is pissed off at his actions, people he needs to move his planks, while his inner-sanctum cabinet members are sabotaging their careers by having to lie for him on a daily basis.

    You know all this, as do others at this blog. Your boy has armed his critics, and the only thing left to say is: well, they were his enemies anyhow.

    Overall, he’s doing exactly what I predicted his infantile vainglorious would do while trying to be a political executive.

    Respond if you wish, but let’s spare each other some elaborate defense of your ‘God emperor;’ as no one’s heart on either ‘side’ would really be in to such a silly gambit, no?

  122. The neat trick
    Swear a fart
    Through a seeve
    Direct action stink breath
    Spread electronically
    Hyperthink
    Dynamically catabolizing
    A political capital’s
    Trumpening…
    Be an author
    For the Narrative
    A most goriest thing
    Glorious-vain
    Through the pain
    Of perverted inversion
    Of the mad insane
    HE IS ONE OF YOU
    Anti-white Supremacy
    Running through his veins
    Fiddling and diddling
    Playing “default elite” games
    Nikcrit Neatrick
    Changing
    By staying the same…

    That’s Radical Autonomy
    But the Donald does it better
    Than the liberated lames…

  123. Thor,
    Nobody knows wtf you’re talking about; if i’m wrong, someone please correct me.

    My position on Trump is specific and consistent.

    Again, i don’t know what you’re getting at. But I do know that i’ve never claimed or tried to be anything analogous to what you claim of Trump and occasionally of me.

  124. Nitpick
    You conduct psychological war
    But miss the dip stick
    So in degrees
    Of anti-white Supremacy
    You’ve nixed the metric
    With a head tricked
    You play head tricks
    Yet unaware
    In a state of “radical autonomy”
    You still write scripts
    With lingering digital footprints
    You press on the nigger lips
    Jive-talking
    To hollowed out nitwits
    Your critique of the Trumpening
    Doesn’t add up
    To a pile of shit

    Why’s that?

    Cuz… You’re a fellow anti-white Supremacist..

  125. The Establishment including the media would rather not be dislodged. Anyone wanting to lessen their influence and power and position is not going to be favored.

    The Establishment including the media is actively hostile to core Americans. What compromise with them can their be?

  126. Fighting to take down the Deep State will take a toll on anyone.

    No one expects it will be easy, or over soon.

    The deleterious effects on Trump himself, and his personality, will arouse sympathy from core Americans, if his heart proves true.

    That, nikcrit, is that question that matters to us. Is his heart still true. Is he fighting against the Deep State which is the Establishment and the media and the rest?

    We expect such a labor will take its toll. And the nitpicking on his personality is beside the point, and characteristic of those who would side with his enemies who are our enemies.

  127. Trump just isn’t going to become a politician, for better or worse.

    We’re still just 1 terror attack away from an even bigger swing to the right for whites.

  128. “Is he fighting against the Deep State which is the Establishment and the media and the rest?”

    Ummm, no he most definitely is not; in fact, that question as applied to Trump could only be borne out of a deluded desperation; there is precious nothing about him that would lead one to believe he was inclined toward the noble mission you suggest. Nothing at all. Rather, everything about the man suggests a tawdry vainglorious that is, btw, insatiable.

    The most hopeful thing about him and his candidacy were the practical goals in his planks: borders, jobs and trade —— and, through the resumes of his cabinet picks and the increasing nonsense coming out of his mouth week-to-week, it’s starting to become clear that he and his cadre are not enemies and vanquishers of the ‘Deep State,’ bur rather its keepers and burnishers for the 21st-century edition.

    Wake up, fellas!

  129. “And the nitpicking on his personality is beside the point, and characteristic of those who would side with his enemies who are our enemies.”

    Yes, I’m really a NAM clandestine HRC supporter.
    Actually, the line you lamely put forth above is about the only thing left in your arsenal. I suspect you more than even others here no goddamn well I’m correct in my criticism. God knows how the right and alt-right would react if some Dem elector behaved like this. And I love the suggestion by some in the alt-right that all this is just calculated preening and posturing. On the part of Bannon? Maybe. On the part of his boss? No way.

  130. “Is he fighting against the Deep State which is the Establishment and the media and the rest?”

    Ummm, no he most definitely is not; in fact, that question as applied to Trump could only be borne out of a deluded desperation;

    Of those 7th floor state department people that Trump fired last month there was a faction that flat out referred to themselves as “the shadow government,” partly in jest, of course. But they did also act with impunity in trying to barter info in a blatant tit-for-tate with the FBI if they could protect Hillary by labeling some compromised emails as “unclassified” after the fact.

    http://nypost.com/2016/10/17/state-department-brokered-deal-with-fbi-to-declassify-clinton-emails/

    Not a huge deal since Trump fired them all, but there’s definitely forces in the state department/CIA/FBI that don’t like the idea of a complete outsider running things his own way and not obeying a lot of what both parties had maintained as the status quo. Yes, the “deep state” stuff is probably overblown, but mainly because it ascribes too much coordination to it all.

    Don’t forget that Obama campaigned as being for “the little guy” in the face of the huge financial meltdown and also appointed the allegedly “tough” prosecutor Preet Bharara to clean up NYC finance – but ultimately how many Wall Street/banking/Goldman types faced justice under him for their role? – zero

    When Bannon talks about “the administrative state” that is a more apt description of how a lot of forces in Washington have grown monstrously and formed their own small loyalties and kingdoms, brokering power back and forth with both parties. It’s an entirely different ecosystem.

  131. And James Comey’s bizarre behavior in the 4 months leading up to the election definitely defies obvious explanation.

  132. The phrase, the Deep State, has ominous overtones that implies competence and conspiracy, but now it has come to mean the entrenched administrative state and their interests, which interests are entirely about maintaining themselves in their position.

    To some extent Trump is dependent on thing as they are. He was a real estate developer, so he works with the system.

    It seems that some people (ahem) will only think in terms of black and white. Trump is either for or against the Deep State. I put it in those terms, but it’s not that simple.

    He would seem to be working to realign the State’s interests to better represent core Americans.

    His motivations in doing so are utterly not the point. I could (not) care less about the extent to which his motivations, in working to align the inevitably existing State’s interests more closely with core Americans, are self-seeking.

    Being hung up on the extent to which Trump’s motivations are self-seeking, reflects a shallow understanding of human nature.

    Of course his motivations are self-seeking. At the same time they are in line with core Americans to a qualitative degree unlike any other politician’s at that level in since forever.

    Trickin, if you think that Trump is scamming us, that is your opinion. I disagree.

    Obviously compromises are always going to part of any deals that can be made, with established interests that have legitimate value and function.

  133. @Cam,

    Yes, but Trump isn ‘t counter-solution to any kind of aristocracies of power and influence that higher-branch fed professionals garner and cultivate; that is a epidemic problem of federal government, period; Trump’s already got a head start on such conflict of interest; gee-zuzz; read the reports about the Kushner’s colluding with fed real estate sale approval and kickback from the controlling purchasing company in China; that among dozens of other deals involving new Trump appointees will keep investigators and conspiratorial spinners busy for years.

    Or would you suggest with a straight face that Trump and his associates would be less inclined to conflate private business with federal access and initiatives.

    Trump wouldn’t even know how to go about shielding himself from scrutiny.

    You guys aren’t really acknowledging the scale of incompetence that’s manifesting. What Cam says is true but beside the point when you indulge some speculative comparison.

  134. “Being hung up on the extent to which Trump’s motivations are self-seeking, reflects a shallow understanding of human nature.

    Of course his motivations are self-seeking. At the same time they are in line with core Americans to a qualitative degree unlike any other politician’s at that level in since forever.”

    elk, you’re blowing smoke—– so please forgive my shallowness. Lol.

  135. Maybe we should have a round-table discussion of these issues, with Omarosa as moderator. She overcame her considerable disappointment at not garnering the Secretary of State nomination enough that she is now flourishing in her new “outreach” position with the Trump administration. 🙂

  136. People also need to understand that Trump is not going anywhere, despite all of the crying and screeching from people who are acting as if his administration could end any day now.

    And the GOP has a commanding supermajority in the House of Representatives. In 2018 there will be 33 senate seats contested – 25 are held by Democrats and only 8 held by Republicans.

    The GOP could even win up to the filibuster-proof level of 60 seats in the Senate in 2018.

  137. Here’s how my city’s most iconic architectural object looks during winter storms:

    PA, I was glad to see that D.C. finally got significant amounts of snow; I figured that would make you happy.

    Personally, I’m no longer charmed by snow once mid-February comes along.

  138. “nikcrit, would you please follow the style of the blog and not use the redundant quotation marks around italicized quotes from other commenters.”

    So italicized remarks alone signify quoted attribution? Really? I didn’t know that; i had noticed it done that way but wasn’t certain it was established standard.

    Duly noted.

  139. In the article notice Bannon’s comment that whenever liberals cannot get something passed, they find a way to accomplish it by regulations elsewhere – Obama’s tranny bathroom “guideline” legislation (now rescinded by Trump) is a prime example.

  140. Nikcrit obviously hates Trump and nothing he does is ever going to be acceptable in his eyes. Cam has stated he is not crazy about Trump’s personality, but he seems to be more objective.

  141. Maybe we should have a round-table discussion of these issues, with Omarosa as moderator. She overcame her considerable disappointment at not garnering the Secretary of State nomination enough that she is now flourishing in her new “outreach” position with the Trump administration. —– Camlost

    I recently leveled criticism at you for vague or irrelevant or in other ways intentionally misleading replies.
    One such tactic of yours is, through much-later response or reference, imply I intended something entirely different from what I did.

    To wit: your Amarosa references in which you cite me mentioning her during the campaign.

    Several times, I raised the spectre of a newly elected Trump naming Amarosa to his cabinet; it was never a literal prediction — BUT RATHER A SPECULATIVE VENTURE ABOUT THE KIND AND CALIBER OF TRUMP APPOINTMENTS IN TERMS OF A GENERAL LEVEL OF SHOCK AND OUTRAGE.

    I NEVER SAID, FOR INSTANCE, “AMAROSA WILL BE NAMED SECRETARY OF STATE.” If you believe otherwise, then you should do 30 seconds of Googling and prove as much.

    As for what i DID do was suggest Trump was capable of doing something ON THAT LEVEL OF OUTRAGE….. And I would readily contend that the appointing of Bannon as NSA head and, even moreso, using Kellyanne Conway as one his chief advisors and spokespersons, is on par for the level and tone of predictivity to which I used Amarosa as example.

    Geez, Cam; your lazy deception and attempts to discredit me are worse than your shameless “essentializing” and “monoculturalizing.” lol… 🙂

  142. I NEVER SAID, FOR INSTANCE, “AMAROSA WILL BE NAMED SECRETARY OF STATE.” If you believe otherwise, then you should do 30 seconds of Googling and prove as much.

    Is all caps shouting your way of saying you didn’t find humerity in my joke? 🙂

  143. ……nothing he (Trump) does is ever going to be acceptable in his eyes.”

    I would be delighted if Trump managed to push through the three major planks that he ran on: working-and-middle-class jobs, immigration reform and new trade deals.

    But I’ve become convinced that won’t happen because of how he lets his personal faults get in the way. IMO, it’s not some gut feeling i’m trying to rationalize; rather, it’s his personal qualities that he puts over his professional goals and allows those qualities to have priority.

  144. I think Kellyanne Conway and Omarosa are good at the talk show circuit, but not qualified for much else. It’s good to let women debate other women. Neither one are Secretary of State caliber.

  145. Big hubbub on “cultural appropriation” at another pricey private school. University Administration supports the “artists”.

    And yes, I agree that WND is not a great source in general, Nik.

    http://www.wnd.com/2017/03/cultural-appropriation-and-hoop-earrings/

    http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-pitzer-hate-speech-20170313-story.html

    “(T)he art was created by myself and a few other WOC (women of color) after being tired and annoyed with the re-occurring theme of white women appropriating styles … that belong to the black and brown folks who created the culture,” she wrote.

    “The culture actually comes from a historical background of oppression and exclusion. The black and brown bodies who typically wear hooped earrings, (and other accessories like winged eyeliner, gold name plate necklaces, etc) are typically viewed as ghetto, and are not taken seriously by others in their daily lives. Because of this, I see our winged eyeliner, lined lips, and big hoop earrings serving as symbols (and) as an everyday act of resistance, especially here at the Claremont Colleges.”

  146. Cam,
    I hate stories like that; i call ’em “you’re-so-oppressive-that-I-can’t-conceive-of-my-happiness-without-you” type protests and agit prop; also, no one seems to see the irony that the entire ‘resistance’ occurs within the most WASPy and feminized environ imaginable; i used to laugh when some of the p.c.-driven marches and other outdoor events at UC would get close to Cottage Grove Ave. and get some spillover from the ghetto neighborhoods that surrounded the campus. In those instances, many of these more brazen student activists would quickly tuck their tail between their legs and then HIGH-tail it eastward, back to more inviting climes by the dorms.

    That said, Claremont is a beautiful campus; I’ve been there a few times for stints of a few days.

  147. the following link is for Cam, PA and peterike, because i know they’re the ones here most worried about the following question (rimshot):

  148. I’ve been too busy to concentrate much on blogging or commenting (other than just reading the comments here) but I can’t wait to read that NYT link. I’m sure it will be … interesting.

    PS: Thordaddy’s last night’s poems made sense to me… good work.

  149. If she wants to raise her daughter to be very racially sensitive, that’s her prerogative. She should let other people raise their children how they want to.

  150. I smell something funny in that article; it’s trollishly stereotypical..

    Consider the following passage:

    After I told my daughter the whole story, she asked, “If Washington held slaves, why do we celebrate him as if he was such a great man?”

    What a good question — one that allowed us to engage in moral reasoning together. I asked her what she thought the reason was. In turn I speculated that sometimes it’s hard to admit our white predecessors did bad things because it makes us feel bad. Then we talked about how we don’t have to just feel bad about the past but instead should find ways to challenge injustice today. We talked about the importance of telling the whole truth, even when it’s hard.

    Isn’t the profoundly stupid verse just a bit too perfectly so? This reads like a good elk parody. This is p.c. within deep and entrenched Williams country; it’s too perfectly clueless to be real. IDK. I’d like to hear how this story came into being —— though the author attribution at the end of the piece (A religion professor at Drake, a premier liberal arts school in Iowa) begins to explain things.

    I sometimes wonder: are some whites embarrassed by whites like the author of the above piece in that same way that certain blacks are at times embarrassed by the Tiptons and other notorious black criminals? I understand that we all intellectually understand how we don’t share racial culpability. But I still wonder if we get some of that feeling in a spontaneous emotional way.

  151. I’ve been too busy to concentrate much on blogging or commenting

    Yeah. As you probably already gathered; i’ve had the opposite vocational clime today…. Ahh, how i love these ‘professional development’ seminars, lots of laptop downtime in the various ‘workshop lounges.” Lol!!

  152. but there’s definitely forces in the state department/CIA/FBI that don’t like the idea of a complete outsider running things his own way and not obeying a lot of what both parties had maintained as the status quo. Yes, the “deep state” stuff is probably overblown, but mainly because it ascribes too much coordination to it all.

    Well, if you think about how ‘realpolitik’ knowledge comes about, it’s usually a practical sensibility that inculcates itself after year-upon-year of steady circumstantial existence; in particular, it resists theoretical or ideal (and thus ‘ideological’) chimeras. And once you accept such practical-experience knowledge, you can see better than anyone how rote or compromised you would sound if you tried to explain as much to all and any layman to that situation.

    So, yeah, there very well could be many things not so good to a neophyte politician coming in and ‘running things’ entirely his own way and with complete autonomy.

    Are you comforted by the thought of Trump have complete and sole autonomy over all and any military emergencies and flashpoints? I would hope that even he himself doesn’t.

  153. the following link is for Cam, PA and peterike, because i know they’re the ones here most worried about the following question

    I won’t click on the Times link. But to the question, “Are we raising racists?” I can only answer, “I sure as hell hope so.”

  154. I won’t click on the Times link. But to the question, “Are we raising racists?” I can only answer, “I sure as hell hope so.”

    My answer is “how could we not?” if you’re going by the left’s quite expansive definition of what constitutes “racism.”

  155. Here’s how my city’s most iconic architectural object looks during winter storms:

    I didn’t know what that was, but then I see it’s the Milwaukee Art Museum. It’s the usual sort of ghastly, aggressively ugly modernism, most typical of Jewish architects. But then I see, ohh, it’s Santiago Calatrava, the Spaniard, a guy who has foisted many a horrendous piece of nihilism on the rest of us. And then there’s Wikipedia….

    “His mother’s family were of Jewish heritage..”

    And BAM, there it is!

  156. Jennifer Harvey, a professor of religion at Drake University,

    Maybe we should take a look at the roster of Drake’s religion department and ask Jennifer when their racial makeup will match that of the rest of the country? She can start the process by resigning first, and ask that her seat be offered to a POC.

  157. @peterike,
    Hey!! When the Stones came to Milwaukee several years back, Jagger himself requested and received a private tour of the Calatrava, replete with a private electronic wing flap of the architectural design. It’s been said he was greatly impressed with the mixture of classical and modern design.

    So THERE you retro anti-postmodernist!!

  158. Speaking of Trump:
    https://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2017/03/13/presidential-executive-order-comprehensive-plan-reorganizing-executive

    This order is intended to improve the efficiency, effectiveness, and accountability of the executive branch by directing the Director of the Office of Management and Budget (Director) to propose a plan to reorganize governmental functions and eliminate unnecessary agencies (as defined in section 551(1) of title 5, United States Code), components of agencies, and agency programs.

    Emphasis added.

  159. @nikcrit Oh well if Mick Fookin JAGGER likes that god awful mess, then I stand corrected.

    Incidentally, Nik, it’s pretty much already been proven that Obama “wire tapped” Trump. The media is simply ignoring the mounting evidence.

    PA – Yeah, there’s a lot of good stuff happening. The media keeps saying “chaos! chaos! nothing is working!” but every day another good thing happens. Talk of massively defunding the UN — a sacrilege! Yet precisely the right thing to do to that whorehouse. Hacking the budget at the EPA and cutting the political, global warming BS spending — inconceivable! Yet precisely right.

    These actions are unthinkable from anyone but Trump. They shatter 100 years of the ball moving in the Progressive direction.

  160. Here is a youtube of Jennifer Harvey,

    https://www.%5Bthiswouldbeutube%5D.com/watch?v=sni7Ct09KsU

    Good god almighty. I am not going to watch ten minutes of that woman speaking for reparations.

    It is worth seeing ten seconds however, to get a look at her face. It is all pierced up, and her eyes are not shining bright with light and love.

    The Times article is apparently in the format of advice on child rearing. Someone else has made a brilliant observation on that format for news articles, something about how the journalist writing as if speaking to and with their child — is exactly what they are doing with their article. So that form allows them their tedious posturing. It allows them to pretend what they are doing with their articles, is something other than the tedious lecturing that it is.

    Jennifer Harvey is a professor of religion at an esteemed university, and yet she looks like a worn out uptown punk.

    If she had any integrity, she would tell her children that slavery was an institution that has existed nearly everywhere around the world since before history began, until Englishman and Americans and their Euro cousins saw fit to end it!

    Which rather astonishing fact is somehow obscured. Such fact is so … very true, and yet they don’t hear about that in the Drake household you can be sure.

  161. That is not how I meant for the youtube link substitution to appear. Obviously substitute the magic words where appropriate, and there would be Ms Harvey doing her shpiel on reparations.

    Harvey is another excellent old American name by the way. And Jennifer Harvey, like her co-ethnic Halley Bass, is a mannish woman of pure white stock.

    It would take a BIG MAN to tame that beast. It does beg the question, of how there are so many of those woman, and who could ever have loved them?

    And I don’t say that mean-spiritedly. It is a real question.

  162. @,Cam,

    How do you know that Drake’s Ecumenical Studies dept. wasn’t staffed primarily by Minos? How rascistly presumptive of you!! 😉

    Actually, I worked at a daily with a lot of Drake grads. I tell ya: those are good people! Very bright, got your back, able to put aside petty ideological beefs on deadline and cover your ass on the copy desk from sending out some embarrassing boner of a mistake to 300,000 unforgiving readers. Y’all make sport of “Williams County”-type sensibility. But I tell you such folk will save your ass in a instant when you really need it. AND THAT REALITY ALONE BUILDS THE KIND OF LOYALTIES THAT WILL KEEP AT BAY ALL THE OTHER PETTY MISERIES WE LOVE TO INFLICT UPON OUR BROTHERS…

    Just something to keep in mind.

  163. “@nikcrit Oh well if Mick Fookin JAGGER likes that god awful mess, then I stand corrected.
    ‘Incidentally, Nik, it’s pretty much already been proven that Obama “wire tapped” Trump. The media is simply ignoring the mounting evidence.”

    peterike, it’s my understanding that the Calatrava was based on a more substantial museum he designed in Balboa, Spain. I have no real opinion on the matter; design and visual arts and fine art are by far my biggest weakness in terms of critical praxis and coverage; very rarely covered visual arts while I often did second-tier reviewing and coverage of theater, literary and cinematic events. I often don’t notice detail of my physical environment; my instincts lean much more toward theoretical structure and thematics and their effects; for me it’s all about the music.

    As for the wire-tapping charge; i gotta say b.s. to all that; none of this staff, pr. media outlets or basically ANYONE is claiming any merit to his charge; there’s also the frightened and overwhelmed ‘deer-in-the-headlights’ gaze he’s registered the last few days when press gets near him and he turns away from the klieg lights, as they yell questions about his accusation across the room. NO ONE IS BACKING UP HIS CONTENTIONS, whether FOX and other partisan media or his own staff, including those that take care of damage control.
    He doesn’t know what he’s doing and he’s way out of his depth and that is obvious and I think both his political allies and foes know as much. I saw Tucker Carlson tonight trying to do dutifully provide some pro-Trump spin and he can’t even muster a sincere look into the camera; Trump should’ve admitted right away it was in-the-heat bluster and took the hit. Now he’s doubling down and looks like a total jackass, committing financial resources to all these waste-of-time investigations.

    Tell me: Why don’t you see not a single media or political entity giving credence to his accusations?

  164. How about this photo of Jennifer Harvey?:

    Without any context or backstory, i would’ve reflexively presumed that photo was of a man. I wonder how such a person would find refuge at Drake; campus life there is hardly some 21st-century postmodern domestic frontier; it’s almost like such folk seek it out to take advantage of the Williams country equilibrium and innocence. That piece in the Times was so disingenuously predictable and boring in many ways.

    Who exactly was her audience in that piece?

  165. Trump can bank political capital as long as the jobs reports keep looking up and the Dow reaches escape velocity out of its Obama era doldrums. but the God Emperor will quickly sink what remains of his fortunes into the health care quagmire should he choose to wade right into that swamp. Obamacare has been institutionalized into every insurance company, hospital, clinic, outpatient surgery center, pharmacy, physical therapy clinic, and every employer who purchases insurance for it’s employees. We are talking a massive, far reaching, bureaucratic regime with it’s tentacles wrapped around every aspect of health care delivery. It is an albatross that can only be repaired while in flight. You just can’t shoot this fucker down and attempt to replace it with something that leaves 10s of millions of sick Americans in the lurch, so many of whom are Trump’s core constituency.

    Here’s the hard truth about healthcare in this country: you can nibble around the edges to find savings here and there, but oftentimes those bureaucratic interventions just make things worse. At the end of the day when you balance the books, you have to reckon with the fact that so much of the population is morbidly obese, very sick with multiple comorbid chronic disease, noncompliant, medical train-wrecks, who are very expensive to take care for. Think of an obese, diabetic, heroin addicted pregnant mom with 3 other babies from various daddies, found in motel room non-responsive, resuscitated from an overdose in the ER and subsequently underwent emergent C-section for a premature baby who will then spend months in the PICU and upon discharge suffer from lifelong respiratory problems as a result. Multiply her x 1000 and you will arrive at just a minuscule fraction of what accounts for our runaway healthcare spending in this country.

    Bottom line – the health care system that people from across aisles want is VERY EXPENSIVE. Someone will have to pay for it all….. it’s either that or RATIONING (which is performed by every socialized health care system.)

  166. it’s either that or RATIONING (which is performed by every socialized health care system.)

    Please explain ‘rationing’ in more detail. Do you mean that some socialized healthcare systems simply do not cover x-amount of the population? Or they ration the resources they do have amongst their ‘caseload’ or however the tally is gathered?

    I’ve never worked, even indirectly, in the healthcare world. But i’ve always been intrigued by the thought; my cynicism sort-of draws the same conclusion that you provide in much more detail above; I just see a western dystopia, ‘poverty of abundance’ style, in which the poorest may still be the fattest adn with all the opportunistic infections and diseases that prey upon overweight, under-exercised degeneration.

  167. I don’t understand why Trump decided to tackle healthcare so soon into his presidency. There seems to be no upside to it.

  168. it’s either that or RATIONING (which is performed by every socialized health care system.)

    I believe that other socialized systems of Europe don’t spend the vast sums of money that we spend keeping some very old and sickly person alive in the 1% chance that they can pop out of their vegetative state and improve. They pull the plug.

  169. …..the 1% chance that they can pop out of their vegetative state and improve. They pull the plug.

    I don’t know; but I doubt that that’s the form of rationing implied in MGE”s statement, because I doubt that such a practice would save a decisive amount of money.

  170. Symbolically, “Obama care” is like that MiLK statue. It represents the “finest face” enveloping the parasitic mind.

    “Healthcare” is a finite resource. And to save a mass of self-annihilators, you must put a gun to the doctor’s head UNLESS he is just plain mad. In MRKA, both truths play out. A “credit where credit is NOT DUE” healthcare system as epitomized by “Obamacare” is bound to cannabilize itself. Yet, such a catabolic regression could take decades with each successive year only accelerating the mass self-annihilation of a poliferating parasite class.

  171. Harvey…

    A progressive calls her a “woman.”

    An alt-riter calls her a “woman.”

    A cuck calls her a “woman.”

    A faggot calls her a “woman.”

    A white Supremacist calls her a “dyke.”

    Who is right and who is wrong?

  172. Presumably, Jennifer Harvey has a vagina, and further her genitals are the result of her birth (they are not surgically modified).

    Therefore she is a woman.

    She is also a dyke, in the common pejorative usage meaning a lesbian.

    Those are the standard meanings and usages for those words, woman and dyke.

  173. Thordaddy, I value your care with words but I agree with Elk in this case. A lemon Honda is still a car. An adult human female in a vegetative state is still a woman. Don’t worry about your comments limit today.

  174. I don’t understand why Trump decided to tackle healthcare so soon into his presidency.

    Because anything passed will take years to implement. Waiting 2 years means you risk getting nothing done.

  175. Jennifer Harvey is a woman, just not one who has much appeal to men. This could be due to appearance, personality or some combination of the two. Most women who lack normal amounts of male attention in life are bitter about it. She is no exception.

  176. If she had a masculine son or a feminine, pretty daughter, she might soften a little, and find some redemption in her kids.

  177. If Harvey is a “woman” then the anti-woman is the figment of an irrational anti-egalitarian mind….

  178. I checked out her video. If she were a man, she’d be attractive. She was just born the wrong sex for her traits.

  179. “If she had a masculine son or a feminine, pretty daughter, she might soften a little, and find some redemption in her kids.”

    No way. She would forcibly feminize the son or masculinize the daughter. I would bet money on it.

  180. Presumably, Jennifer Harvey has a vagina, and further her genitals are the result of her birth (they are not surgically modified).

    Therefore she is a woman.

    She is also a dyke, in the common pejorative usage meaning a lesbian.

    Those are the standard meanings and usages for those words, woman and dyke. — Elk

    These ideas of yours are not the product of a 149 IQ….

    Females do not become “women” at a certain point of degeneration. Such belief is profoundly absurd.

    And “lesbian” is a passive liberal’s euphemistic label for dyke, i.e., anti-woman..

  181. The alt-rite conception of “woman” is a corrupted co-opting of the early “men’s” rights movement’s “definition” of “woman.” It is a self-serving anti-definition* which makes allowance for the sexually degenerate “man.” In other words, a dyke equals a “woman” SO THAT a “man” can be homosexual.

    * There is no definition in “equality.”

  182. The nearly unimaginable arrogance of a deracinated dyke setting about to teach WHITE FATHERS how to raise their sons in the anti-racist pathology that may very well have triggered one’s dyke ethos is now to be imagined and pondered and contemplated for the act of utter psychological war that such screeching represents.

  183. Please explain ‘rationing’ in more detail. Do you mean that some socialized healthcare systems simply do not cover x-amount of the population? Or they ration the resources they do have amongst their ‘caseload’ or however the tally is gathered?

    Moreso the latter. Without getting too wonky and outside the scope of this blog, most systems guarantee efficient access to primary care (family/internal medicine and OB-Gyn) but place restrictions on costly specialty care so as to curtail ballooning healthcare budgets as we are seeing in the US.

    For instance, the NHS uses a formula called “QALY” to determine if a patient qualifies for some specialized interventions. It stands for “Quality Adjusted Life Year,” and it is just as brutally utilitarian as it sounds. Long wait times for specialists are the norm – In Canada and the UK, you will wait an average of 20 weeks to see a specialist. I read an a report a couple years back concerning NHS radiology turnaround times that just floored me:

    The sample, which included both large urban teaching hospitals and small rural hospitals, were asked how many imaging examinations – x-rays and CT and MRI scans – had waited more than 30 days to be read, or “reported”, by a radiologist.

    It found that 81,137 X-rays and 1,697 CT and MRI scans had not been analysed for at least 30 days, even though the expectation in the NHS is that such potentially vital diagnostic tests should be examined within a week at most, in case they prove significant.

    “If this reflects the national picture, about 300,000 patients are currently waiting more than a month for their x-rays to be analysed and about 6000 patients have waited more than a month for the results of CT and MRI scans,” the college said.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/nov/13/nhs-scan-result-delays-cancer-patients-x-ray

    In the US, turnaround time for the aforementioned studies is expected to be less than 24 hours, and if ordered from the ER, a preliminary interpretation is expected within an hour or so for even the most complex cases.

    This is stuff you will never hear the Berniebros talk about when they demand “Medicare For All.”

  184. I just see a western dystopia, ‘poverty of abundance’ style, in which the poorest may still be the fattest adn with all the opportunistic infections and diseases that prey upon overweight, under-exercised degeneration.

    Yes, this is exactly what we are seeing, as PA illustrated with his “Stockings Man” archetype.

    Like him, I am personally mortified on some level when I encounter someone like that.

    Not that I would ever judge or shame someone for their physical maladies, self inflicted or otherwise… it’s more of a grim recognition of a crisis of spirit that seems to be afflicting our underclass that has been chronicled by Charles Murray in Coming Apart. Interestingly, the recent assault at his speaking engagement at Middleburry only served to prove his point in a most dramatic fashion.

  185. MGE, thanks for the run-down on healthcare. One horrific scenario in socialized medicine is the bureaucracy that triages patients by priority. An acquaintance told me about a 30-year-old Canadian who died of a preventable ailment due to the delays in treatment because he was initially denied some service. His family is convinced that a low-level clerk bumped him down on account of his records describing the patient as “white male.” Apparently, those public-sector positions in Canada are heavily staffed by browns. Analogously in the US there was a case of a black female Dept of Agriculture clerk who was caught circular-filing White farmers’ applications for aid. There are also many anecdotal examples of down-on-their-luck Whites being denied welfare by La’queefa at Human Services.

    Socialized medicine is an apex-civilization arrangement, it’s a minefield of abuse when irresponsible patients (noncompliant, obese, addicts) consume it and shit-grade administrators run it.

  186. Socialized medicine is an apex-civilization arrangement, it’s a minefield of abuse when irresponsible patients (noncompliant, obese, addicts) consume it and shit-grade administrators run it.

    One of the practical lessons we can glean from HBD is that socialized medicine in Mexico will be much different than socialized medicine in Switzerland. No amount of re-jiggering the insurance system will remedy the underlying population genetics and its attendant social dysfunctions.

    In the US, La’queefa can waltz into the ER at 3:00 AM with her medicaid card and demand prompt treatment of her ingrown toenail, which was exacerbated by her twerkin all night at da club. And she will often demand a totally unnecessary X-Ray for said condition, based on the expert opinion she formed after googling on her Obamaphone. (And don’t you tell her no, she will demand to speak to the manager of dis place cuz deez doctas be raycis and shit) Her bill for all this will come to $5, give or take depending on what state she is in, and she won’t even pay that token sum. Meanwhile, a vietnam vet will wheeze a last ragged gasp from his agent orange scarred lungs outside the VA while waiting 6 months to see Dr. Vishnu Ramachamadingdong, who is only working for the government as recompense for Medicare fraud.

    For those of you who don’t experience our social welfare system up close and you want to know what it’s truly like, just throw a stack of $20’s into the toilet and flush several times. When it doesn’t go down and the toilet is overflowing, take that brush thingy and forcibly shove that wad of cash down into the sewer. There should be enough money in the bowl so you really have to work up a sweat.

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