Bullying

It wasn’t called “bullying” when I was in school. We called it “picking on.” The b-word may have been popularized by the film Bully (2001), or maybe two years earlier in the aftermath of Columbine High School killings. The concept of bullying is now politicized. I won’t dwell much on that aspect here except to note that anti-bullying campaigns don’t do much to protect White or Asian kids from race-based attacks in Black schools. But what I want to look at here is the dynamic of bullying among boys on its continuum that spans from legitimate in-group correction or rite-of-passage hazing, on to its destructive excesses.

Here is an anecdote: I made friends easily at age 13, having just arrived in the United States. It was a neighborhood with blue collar families and young couples with starter homes. There was also a tall 14-year-old mesomorph Brady (all names have been changed) and his sidekick Darren. We were on guard around Brady. He’d ride up on his dirt bike — sometimes alone, sometimes with Darren — and joke around, and then look squarely at one of us, for example at Jason, crack a grin and tell him that his mom is a fat pig. Jason wasn’t stupid so he lowered his eyes and kept his mouth shut.

Brady was a fact of life, like the elements. It was validating when he rode up to us because he was cool and the high school guys liked him. He in fact mostly hang out with them. But his visits were also tense because you did not want to say the wrong thing, and he baited us to say something wrong. One day his buddy Darren mouthed off to me with an ethnic insult. I ignored it and that’s how trouble started with Brady. Darren thought I was afraid of him, so he then repeatedly challenged me to a fight (but only when Brady was around). I blew off the challenges as comical because he was smaller than me.

My being scared of Darren was not in the realm of the possible. Back in Poland boys fought all the time. We had these gangs with formal rank structures and at one point parents intervened because a boy was karate-kicked in the throat. It was a retaliatory ambush that I organized, though the potentially lethal strike wasn’t part of the plan. What I was afraid of though, was my family getting deported. My parents warned me to stay out of trouble in America and I took that very seriously. So hell no, I wasn’t going to beat up a weaker kid.

The interval of time between Darren’s first challenge to a fight and my eventual response, a period of several weeks, was what you could call “being bulled.” Or picked-on. It was just Brady’s physical intimidation and Darren’s name-calling, I got along well otherwise. But my pacifism was starting to look bad and people were letting me know it.

“Fine, we’ll fight when we get off the bus,” I told Darren. We got off, the school bus left and everyone formed a wide circle around us. This is ridiculous, I thought, sizing up the boy’s puny frame. I squared up to Darren as he’s dancing around and taunting me. I swung halfheartedly, grazing his face as he dodged my strike. He then ran screaming — and my predator instinct switched on. I caught him, took him down like a baby gazelle and started pummeling. An adult pulled me off him and the crowd laughed at Darren as he paced in circles sobbing.

I didn’t get deported, but I did graduate to Brady. He sticks his finger in my face and says: “You and I. Tomorrow morning. Bus stop.” This was serious. I couldn’t sleep that night and intentionally missed the bus in the morning. Wuss move… I knew it then and rightly took flak for it that afternoon on the bus ride home. So, next morning it is.

The ground was hard and covered in frost. Brady and I faced each other on someone’s lawn. People from two neighborhoods had come to see the fight, even the girls. I’ve only known his eyes for their mocking glint when he wasn’t otherwise laughing about something else. Now, they were cold and deliberate. The jackets come off.

As it goes with fights, you don’t remember much. It’s all tunnel-vision. You don’t hear anything because your brain regresses to a shark’s biting frenzy. We’re on the grass, elbows pumping as two-way punches bruise the gut, sides, ribs, face and head. Somebody separated us. I stand in a daze, a warm stream flowing from my nose. I rub my lip and my fingers are covered in red. He’s facing me, face crimson and crumbled. He’s wiping the blood from his mouth and chin… and crying.

He cried, I won — the older guys called it and so it was. The next day I was walking and a man leans out of his front door and shouts from across the street: “Hey PA, I heard you kicked Brady’s ass! Way to go man!” Let me tell you folks, the sun was shining bright that day. I’ve had successes in the decades that followed, but that kudos stands out above most to this day for me.

Soon after the fight, Brady and I became friends. For the next three years until he moved out, we hang out at each other’s houses and during the summer took our ten-speeds out on long rides. His parents once took me out on a trip where I first smelled pot. In the summer of ’85 we rode bikes to a construction site where his older brother worked and hung out with the contractors during their lunch breaks.

***

Bullying serves a valuable function of regulating wrong behavior and keeping boys sharp. An example of a simple correction: I once saw a group of guys bust their friend’s balls because he was absentmindedly eating a banana like he was giving a blowjob. He caught on and stopped.

Brady did me a favor. He found my weakness and hammered on it until I did something about it. To earn self-respect and the respect of others, you have to face your fear and walk through it. Anti-bullying campaigns, in short-circuiting White teenagers’ system of hazing and censure, are a reason why there are now so many Gammas — weaklings who deign take a shortcut to status by running their mouths like fiat currency.

But — bullying can spiral out of control and indicate adult intervention. Healthy boys have more aggression than wisdom so things can became a Lord of the Flies jungle. Examples:

1. Some instances of bullying do not offer the mark any avenue of redeeming himself. The kid hadn’t done anything to deserve being a target of cruelty for sport, and fighting back only makes it worse. For a boy to go through that is comparable to a girl getting gang-raped. There is a reason why survivors of wartime interrogation never talk about the experience and some later commit suicide.

2. A lost-cause like Gomer Pyle in Full Metal Jacket. Some can’t be helped and for them, a USMC boot camp becomes a tearing-down, but with no prospects of then building-up. Sure, Pyle didn’t need to smuggle in that jelly doughnut… but would he have had it any other way? Just cut him loose. Otherwise you’re destroying a human being and pushing things toward murder-suicide.

3. There are videos from schools in Germany. Smaller, younger native boys getting slapped around by Muslims. That’s not bullying — that’s lambs in a labyrinth. It’s the nation itself being bullied, being dared to do something about it. Will the adults do what needs to be done or will one of these boys step forward as their Theseus?

***

There is either a metaphorical or a real moment in a boy’s life when he approaches a ball field. Maybe he’s in a new school. The guys notice him. One chucks the ball at him. A sharp kid will catch that ball. He who drops it, might have a hole to dig himself out of. And if honor is challenged, it comes down to prison rules: throw a punch.

TL;DR: Sometimes you’ve got to fight when you’re a man.

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52 thoughts on “Bullying

  1. That is a good story.

    Mine would be coeval and not so happy.

    I did not rise to the challenge and carried a lot of grief, for a long time. In many ways i still do.

    If it weren’t so fucking sappy, i would relate to whole tale, and it does have its resolution.

  2. Nice post. I got my @ss handed to me in my first Real Deal scrap around that age. A college frat jumped me out of nowhere for coming at one of their ‘little brothers’ my own age, even walloping my shoulders w/ crow bars when I was already knocked unconscious. It’s been a deep motivator ever since, to put it extremely lightly.

    It can also be a redeeming thing to lose your first fight. You become more familiar with the finer nature of transience. The sun mercilessly subsuming the earth, we basically being ‘mirrors’ ourselves, etc. A deep acceptance of ephemerality inexplicably leads to experiences/encounters that will never die.

  3. The past is never dead.

    The resolution to my story is very cliche. I live in the old neighborhood and so does my old antagonist, The Bully.

    Against whom my grievances seem legitimate, now that i am thinking about them.

    Basically he and his three friends, who were a grade ahead and the biggest dogs, mocked me AND MY MOTHER for our ramshackle car. And i was unable to do anything about it.

    They hated me because i was insufferably confident but not an athlete at their level.

    There were times when i was drunk that i almost flipped out, about that shit, and 30 years later.

    Oh but the resolution. I finally crossed paths with him and gave him a hard look. Not a try-hard look but just an odd look, that maybe told him that i had a beef with him.

  4. Every one gets it, eventually. (everyone gets got)

    I don’t see that you ever really can let it go.

    Certainly a problem with our scaled-up society, is that our aggression doesn’t have a target. (any niggers around?)

    And yeah, to point out obvious irony, my personal beefs, are mostly against “fellow whites” and not the niggers.

    ******************

    Bowery’s idea of a final dispute resolution in the form of Natural Duel is applicable. He insists that that mechanism has to be in place, for a society to function. Otherwise how are those beefs resolved?

    I agree with that idea. That any man of full standing in the community has the prerogative to Natural Duel, with any other. And the challenge cannot be refused.

  5. Is it a dilemma that the real heroes are dead?

    In The Crossing, Boyd and his younger brother Billy go down into Mexico to get back their father’s horse, Nino, and they do, and but then four armed Mexicans come at them and reclaim it.

    Billy is reluctant to relinquish Nino back to them, but Boyd says that they’ve come too far to go back dead, and turns him over.

  6. There’s more to my story with those guys, back in 1982, but it doesn’t matter. You have indulged me quite a bit here, but it seems necessary to add this detail.

    Their leader, who in high school would be captain of the hockey team, wanted to fight me and i refused. And it was after that that they mocked me and my mother.

    Ok, that’s it. I promise.

    ******************

    There is a great article called The Real Heroes are Dead, about 9/11. And it treats the theme with a lot of depth.

  7. Having grown up mostly in military towns it had quite a “conforming” influence on kids – not much acting out of any type, including fighting. Every adult somewhere was a potential old retired sergeant that would straighten out even the biggest, rowdiest group of kids just by raising his voice once.

    The fights we did have in high school were usually between two black girls, and featuring a lot of wild arm swinging, then tumbleweeds of pulled hair extensions strewn across the hallway floors.

  8. Real heros aren’t dead. You know them as criminals or monsters.

    Anders was a hero. He did what was right in the face of the entire world and they jailed him for it. When he gets out, he will be recognized.

    There is no greater bully that the one we face, and no greater turnabout that the one we shall win.

  9. “Soon after the fight, Brady and I became friends.”

    Every single time. When boys finally work it out via a fight, they have more mutual respect for each other than anyone else.

  10. Pingback: Bullying | Reaction Times

  11. Understand what bullying, stripped of its current political uses, is….the appropriation of power by a party who does not have it de jure.

    No sane society can tolerate handing authority to children, Lord of the Flies was not an instruction book. Before our current social atomization, this was partially mitigated by family and traditional neighborhood structures. In a socially atomized world, there aren’t any structures other than the state to deal with the situation, and we all know that relying on the low level state employees for anything is dangerous.

    Also, add the fact that for the Baby Boomers, avoiding violence is a requirement for status. One did not get good job offers with a reputation for street fights. As our red pill co-travellers would point out, that all but bred a taste for violence out of middle and upper class US culture.

    Serious people do not fight, they destroy their enemies. Gates did not challenge Janet Reno to a fight in the Texas flatbrush, he lobbied against her in the Congress. With education under the USG, that logic cannot be internalized by children, with rather…..messy results when it is. Also, it would make mincemeat of the whole process, which is designed to keep people quiet while getting paid. If you can’t throw people out for being violent problems, you surely can’t tolerate other students trying to do the same.

    I doubt very much that the premiere experts at defeating enemies, your Kidons, Special Activity Division, DGSE, Brandenburgers, MI6, etc., were bullies.

  12. — It can also be a redeeming thing to lose your first fight. (Each Pond Gone)

    My one loss was at 22. There was booze all around, I was instigating and a big dude pinned me down trapping my arms under me and pounded on my face until he got tired. I remember thinking “fuck this hurts, when is he gonna stop.” A lifelong lesson in humility was learned.

    — The larger less personal perspective, is that they were trying to teach me some humility, and i woulda done well to listen. (Suburban_elk)

    Have they had their own humility lesson?

    — Every adult somewhere was a potential old retired sergeant that would straighten out even the biggest, rowdiest group of kids just by raising his voice once. (Camlost)

    Maximum adult oversight. Good or bad, or YMMV?

    — There is no greater bully that the one we face, and no greater turnabout that the one we shall win. (Ryu)

    Yes. I built up to that near the end of the post.

    — When boys finally work it out via a fight, they have more mutual respect for each other than anyone else. (realgaryseven)

    Ain’t that the truth.

    — No sane society can tolerate handing authority to children, Lord of the Flies was not an instruction book. Before our current social atomization, this was partially mitigated by family and traditional neighborhood structures. (UlricKerensky)

    Camlost’s military-kid circumstances sound like they played that role well.

    — Serious people do not fight, they destroy their enemies. Gates did not challenge Janet Reno to a fight in the Texas flatbrush, he lobbied against her in the Congress. (UlricKerensky)

    At first impression that was a very depressing thing to read. Then it occurred to me that Trump may well finally be someone destroying our enemies on our behalf.

  13. When I was in high school we had a little bit of a slow kid that was once getting bothered by two glam rock kind of white kids.

    This very popular, friendly and tremendously big black guy on the football team gave them one look and said “leave him the hell alone, he’s not bothering you – so you don’t f**ck with him.”

    And that was the end of that.

  14. Have they had their own humility lesson?

    One of em died in a motorcycle accident in high school. It was tragic for his family (obviously).

    He was a talented X-Games type athlete, and BMX was his thing, so it was ironic that he bought it on a bike.

    But i would not say that Death is a humility lesson. It is in another category of its own.

    As far as the particulars for the other guys, i don’t know em well enough to say, what became of em. Not even just to get a read of their faces.

    In the rhetorical sense of the question, your guess is as good as mine. What do you think?

  15. With education under the USG, that logic cannot be internalized by children, with rather…..messy results when it is. Also, it would make mincemeat of the whole process, which is designed to keep people quiet while getting paid. If you can’t throw people out for being violent problems, you surely can’t tolerate other students trying to do the same.

    I don’t follow this. Care to elaborate?

  16. [I]
    I don’t follow this. Care to elaborate?[/I] (Suburban_elk)

    If one accepts that controlled targeted violence is the eventual final resort of serious parties, something of a combination of Machiavelli and Clausewitz, then such actions are rational, in whatever form they take. Usually a nation-state does not go to the trouble to give someone a beating, different states have used different levels of violence. The UK does not send the SAS to challenge someone to a fistfight in the playground.

    To a child, particularly in a supposedly meritocratic egalitarian civil government, that logic becomes extremely messy. The point of modern USG, and probably most of the Anglophone world, education is to get as many age segregated kids in as possible. Different parts of the education complex have different reasons and processes, but the overall logic is to get as many kids in as possible, preferably all of them.

    Apply the logic of the above rational actors to a child, particularly one cut off from traditional social structures by the modern social atomization. The State, which has the financial, organizational, legal, moral, and practical power to compel that child’s mandatory attendance with other children, has placed that child in a position where they cannot apply the logic of rational actors to the situation. In short, for whatever reason in that instance, bullies cannot be removed by force of law, instead they are, for all intents and purposes, allowed to exercise utterly illegal violence or the threat of violence against other children. Are the younger bullies guilty of a crime? No, they lack mens rea by any reasonable standard.

    If a legal child applies the logical of serious rational people to the situation, the most rational decision would be to leave, but that is forbidden by custom, law, and practicality. The next most rational decision would be to appeal to authority figures to act according to the authority figures’ own purported legal and moral basis, and remove the bullies. As we’ve discussed above in this thread, that’s unlikely to happen in many cases. The Westphalian logic is that Rulers of States, and only States, have recourse to directed violence, and that a monopoly on violence must be maintained to be a functioning State. Bullying, as I defined it above, is the act by private actors to violate that State monopoly. To a person on the receiving end of that, it rapidly becomes a situation where they can be reasonably described, by a disinterested party, to be beyond the protection of the State that compels their presence under threat of penalty and eventual violence against them and their family members.

    At this point, by what would be rational logic when applied by a state or a serious adult party, things become messy.

  17. Mohamed Bajjar and Clare Moseley.

    According to this blog, the former is a model.

    Defectives like me should hope to be born again, and be more like him.
    If not actually macaques, at least orangutans. Alpha ones, of course.

    I wish we had a clip of him eating a banana, so I could imitate his way.

  18. The SAS is simply the jazzy name for the Prime Minister’s enforcers.

    All groups have enforcers who kill on command. The Aryan Brotherhood, Mafia, POTUS, the Mex cartels, ISIS, they all have them.

    WN has no, or very few such enforcers. We must develop them and in a sense, worship them, as the Americans worship SEALs or the Brits worship the SAS. Give them a sense of awe and invincibility.

    The enemy has bullied us for too long.

    There is one solution to being bullied – fighting back. When whites do fight back, they will find that it is quite easy and the enemy was not that tough. PA’s post must be combined with this post by Bobby:
    http://uncabob.blogspot.com/2017/01/call-him-lord-coward.html

  19. To a person on the receiving end of that, it rapidly becomes a situation where they can be reasonably described, by a disinterested party, to be beyond the protection of the State that compels their presence under threat of penalty and eventual violence against them and their family members.

    It is an apt metaphor for the citizens of the United States, and England, and France, etc.

    And “apt metaphor” is better conceived of as a parallel structure. What is imposed on the children at school, is imposed on the adults at large.

  20. cam: “When I was in high school we had a little bit of a slow kid that was once getting bothered by two glam rock kind of white kids…….This very popular, friendly and tremendously big black guy on the football team gave them one look and said “leave him the hell alone, he’s not bothering you – so you don’t f**ck with him.””

    For some reason that reflection of yours made me think of this particular character and scene:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YYV5f0Aqo4w .

  21. I once saw a group of guys bust their friend’s balls because he was absentmindedly eating a banana like he was giving a blow job.

    Sure it wasn’t Jennifer Jason Leigh?

  22. — And “apt metaphor” is better conceived of as a parallel structure. What is imposed on the children at school, is imposed on the adults at large. (Elk)

    Under “The Cycles of Popular Music” Each Pond Gone perceptively noted: “This goes beyond popular music.” Yep, it was also about teenage struggle and other things. My m.o. when in the zone with some posts is that I am in fact talking about more than the nominal subject. That is the case here.

    The story took place exactly as described and it also happens to work as a parable of what’s been happening in the West. I tolerated disrespect from a harmless nuisance, Darren. My fear was not of him, but the feds (literally). My tolerance ended up inviting more serious problems in the form of an actual dangerous enemy, Brady. I was eventually cornered into a do-or-die place and had to fight Brady. It was literally bloody but fighting also won me respect and sovereignty.

    Kenny Rogers’ “The Coward of the County” is also analogous. Tommy’s misguided pacifism got his wife raped. He’s then left with no option but to unleash war. When you pay attention to the lyrics, you understand that he shoots and kills the Gatlin boys.

  23. The situation as described by UlricKerensky is ultimately for the purpose of triggering unstable lone white wolves for annihilation.

    The now near ubiquity of the “bully” is, in the mind of a lone white wolf, an incessant and disturbing reminder that one is really a LONE white wolf pup.

  24. O.T.,

    Since our president until recently owned the pageant, perhaps we should have a PA World pool on who’ll win tonight’s Miss Universe Pageant?

    I’ll wager $10 that tonight’s winner is an Asian —– Global Asian viewership of Western broadcast product is up 20% in the last two years; cable penetration is over Hong Kong and now moving into rural areas.

    Facts like those, more than anti-white ideological views, are often what account for the racial composition of modern television production.

  25. The longer the press goes is not reporting the identity of the shooter in last night’s Quebec Mosque attack, the greater the chance it’s not a “preferred” type of suspect.

    Did anyone here notice the Wikileaks Podesta email on the San Bernardino shooting?:

    “Better if a guy named Sayeed Farouk was reporting that a guy named Christopher Hayes was the shooter,”

    http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/301254-podesta-it-would-have-been-better-if-san-bernardino-shooter

  26. I didn’t get bullied, luckily, because of two things: 1 – I was (am) smart and knew how to deliver a verbal zinger, and 2 – I am an athlete. I was a pitcher growing up through college. A fastball in the small of the back does wonders for one’s reputation. Say something, dumbass, and I’ll knock your ass down with a high, hard one. I even threw brushbacks during practice to my own teammates. I don’t give a crap who you are – don’t be an ass or I’ll knock you down. I knew how to play, and it helped my rep. The locker room ribbing was fine, but i knew how to take it, and how to give it. I tell my students now (as a HS teacher), go ahead and say it, but you better be able to take it, too. Can’t take it? Then knock it off.

  27. They always considered him
    The Coward of the County …

    In those lyrics though, the story that the three Gatlin Brothers come a callin and take each his turn on Becky, is implausible.

    They gang-rape her and then retire to the saloon to go about business as usual?

    Yeah the West was a rough place, and even to the point where we can hardly imagine it. BUT IT WAS WHITE, and that sort of shit would not fly.

    Yes and in the song they don’t get away with it, but i don’t think that behavior would even obtain in the first place.

    It is just not a believable story.

    Unlike the Gambler, which is set in the same time and place, the Old West of the American Imagination, but which story works on every level.

    Without checking, does Rogers get the songwriting credits on both those songs?

    Consider the likely fact that The Gambler is was or has been the most sung along song in America, in the last 100 years.

    Every Gambler knows
    that the secret to Survivin
    is knowin what to throw away
    and knowin what to keep

    cause every Hand’s a winner
    and very Hand’s a loser
    and the best that you can hope for
    is to die in your sleep

  28. “Yes and in the song they don’t get away with it, but i don’t think that behavior would even obtain in the first place.”

    The way that the story is presented, does not seem believable.

    The Gatlin Brothers are the bad guys in town. Or even outlaws.

    But even the bad guys, the outlaws in the Old West, are not going around gang-raping the townswomen, and then retiring to the local pub.

    I may be failing to express my point, which is about the incongruity of the setting in that song, the setting of that story, as it is presented.

    Part of Rodger’s appeal was that he played the part for his fans, for America looking for heroes really, believably.

    As rough as it was, there were standards that were not violated. And gang-raping the townswomen would be clear violation.

    The Sioux Indians who were part of that landscape, would castrate but otherwise let live those among them found guilty of raping one of their women.

  29. It is easy to forget that Kenny Rodgers was a star — like John Denver — who was in the very top bracket. In terms of album sales but in terms of whatever it was that being a star meant.

    Those two men, those two guys — were perhaps the last two authentic American icons.

  30. When we were children, the older kids would make us fight, amongst ourselves, even if we did not want to.

    If you wanted to run with the big dogs, you had to fight.

    The kids will establish their hierarchy one way or another. How do they do it these days?

  31. “The Sioux Indians who were part of that landscape, would castrate but otherwise let live those among them found guilty of raping one of their women.”

    Castrate may not be the right word.

    I do not know what parts of the transgressor’s genitals were removed.

    There would be three principle alternatives: the frank, the beans, and both.

    Or the testicles are considered each separately, in which case how many alternatives would that allow, six?

  32. La Blueff is playing lone “white” wolf pup turned mad cow cattlist herdling a trumpening of the bully’s pull-pit.

  33. I had brief trouble with bullying in my youth. My iron father’s response was to buy me an Everlast heavy bag, and teach me the rudiments of boxing. After which I learned that connecting with a hard right will cause all but the most dedicated bullies to stop. There were other incidents and I suppose i went from punk to predator as I became skilled at violence and used it to solve many otherwise intractable problems. I view “bullying” just a part of life, not unlike the pecking order among chickens or the pack hierarchy of wolves. Man is of course nothing more than a highly developed animal.

  34. I do 20 minutes with a heavy bag every couple of weeks. It has the effect of wind-sprints with to-failure shoulder work. Learn the basics from a Youtube tutorial, always keep your hands high, strike with 30% of your strength concentrating on form, and have a gallon of water nearby. You own the world when done.

  35. I would be willing to support giving African Americans more if they would support drastically reduced immigration.

  36. I have a knack for the speed bag. They had one at the gym i was at for awhile, in the locker room, which was sorta old school and cool. But then they closed that room off, and then for other reasons i cancelled my membership.

    Been meaning to get one and hang it in the garage. I worked on it as a percussion instrument, and always had doubts that it was much use in training for a boxing match. But the experts must think otherwise.

  37. But speaking of locker rooms, the gay quotient got to be a little high.

    There a well known manosphere blogger called Bronan, who did character sketches of the people at the gym, and one of the types he described was the guy who hung out (hung out, get it?), in the locker room at the gym, naked.

    That would be his thing. Hanging out in the locker room. Naked. At the gym. (not that there is anything wrong with that)

  38. AIDS gave faggots easy access to the most scientifically advanced PEDs.

    So any civilization finally collapsing congruent to a cabal of faggots at its helm will always get the ass-trick next to its “name” in the hisstory books.

  39. There a well known manosphere blogger called Bronan, who did character sketches of the people at the gym, and one of the types he described was the guy who hung out (hung out, get it?), in the locker room at the gym, naked.

    Right now the over 60 crowd has no compulsion about hanging out in gym locker rooms naked at all times. They’re just free balling it without a thought. I used to belong to this very high-end gym (like 90$ a month) and the clientele was a mostly older, successful crowd who seemed to mainly be there to conversate with other old folks in the buff.

    The gen X crowd – not so much.

    And I had actually noticed this myself when I came across an article talking about how gym designers are now planning for the higher privacy needs of younger generations:

    http://www.wicked.online/article-post/millennials-dont-like-to-get-naked-in/

  40. Songwriters Skip Ewing and the man – Max t Barnes.
    Knew every word in 4th grade. Thought the corny movie was badass as well.
    Becky was box.

  41. “I won’t dwell much on that aspect here except to note that anti-bullying campaigns don’t do much to protect White or Asian kids from race-based attacks in Black schools.”

    Indeed. In fact, bullying only became “problematic” when gays were the victims (real or imagined) back in the 90’s. Prior, no one cared about Blacks and Mexicans (bussed-in from downtown) picking on the white kids. Today, white kids have been ethnically cleansed from those schools, so maybe there’s less bullying now.

  42. Grade school: got beat up by a couple older kids, never did know why.

    Jr. High (7th grade): I was on my way to becoming the 2nd biggest kid in the school, but was shy and passive. That attracted predation from a smaller kid who thought punching me was great sport. That ended when one day he punched me in the boy’s rest room and I lost it. Complete impulsive mind takeover. I wrapped my arm around his neck and picked him completely off the ground, strangling him. His buddy jumped on my back, and that allowed my rage to subside, otherwise I’d probably have choked him unconscious or worse. That clown never touched me again. Lesson learned: weakness invites predation, and if you want fools to stop harassing you, hit they so hard they never imagine doing so again.

    3rd year college: I led a group of mostly freshmen on a goofy, abortive prank on a nearby frat house, trying to throw water balloons into its courtyard during a party. Not one made it, and we returned to the dorm laughing. We were followed by a drunk frat boy who, engaging in a Status Seeking Show (see Rory Miller), eventually sucker-punched me at point-blank range, his ring tearing open my upper lip. Lessons learned: Drunks don’t feel pain, so punching their nuts full blast has no effect–strikes to the nuts are grossly overrated. Never get within arm’s reach of drunk. Rage is a terrible handicap when trying to fight (at least if you’re poorly trained.) In any potential confrontation, protect your head; get your hands up, open or closed, but get them in place to protect your face, your jaw, your head. The head is everything.

    My sons all mostly avoided fights. Part of me thinks that’s good, part of me wonders if they may have missed important lessons. I always told them, if someone hits you (in school), don’t immediately hit back. The first hit attracts attention. Wait until attention is diverted again, then hit them at least twice as hard as they hit you. If they come back at you (and they will), they’ll get caught. Of course, for the last 20 years there’s been no attempt to assign blame in school fights. Both aggressor and defender are punished equally. My youngest had to learn this by experience.

  43. Dc.sunsets: we both learned the wrongheadedness of letting a minor nuisance (a weak wanna-be “bully”) escalate things with us. Misguided tolerance leads to bigger problems.

  44. PA, we both agree: You get more of whatever it is you reward, or tolerate. This axiom of humanity seems lost on a lot of people, or they twist it to their own inverted values and exhibit intolerance of intolerance toward what they demand be tolerated (or rewarded.)

    Bottom line: I don’t like people. (grin)

  45. “Grade school: got beat up by a couple older kids, never did know why.”

    Because they were older than you and could get away with it. That’s the only reason they needed.

  46. Pingback: Bullying (Part I) – Musings of a Scotch Drinking Man

  47. I chanced upon

    There is a tide in the affairs of men,
    Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune;
    Omitted, all the voyage of their life
    Is bound in shallows and in miseries.
    On such a full sea are we now afloat,
    And we must take the current when it serves
    Or lose our ventures.

    and it reminded me of the basketball to catch, or not to catch, spoke of in this post.

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