President Trump’s Checklist

Nov. 2016 update: another box just got checked off.

trp6

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33 thoughts on “President Trump’s Checklist

  1. Good graphic. Trump’s success has been quite remarkable. To the point where I genuinely fear for his safety.

  2. Pingback: President Trump’s Checklist | Reaction Times

  3. Matt Walsh is a loser cuck. Shit, his previous blog (on his own site, not the Blaze) on Trump got like 5 comments – four of them pointing out what a worthless piece of crap he is (one of them mine).

  4. The Republican endorsements are rolling in, Rick Perry re-endorsed Trump again yesterday after initially supporting Cruz and also threatening to be part of the nevertrump crowd.

    This will all be over once Cruz himself speaks up and endorses Trump, probably in return for a cabinet or SC appointment.

    Politico has a list of GOP Trump endorsements, this list includes Jerry Falwell, but leaves out Herman Cain, Bob Dole, Newt Gingrich and a host of others.

    http://www.politico.com/story/2016/03/donald-trump-endorsements-219813

  5. I think Trump has a good chance to win the general election. That’s what worries me a little. Being in the opposition seems more fun than actually running things.

  6. The nevertrump movement s huge and many conservatives will not even consider voting for him.

    Lol! The cucks in the nevertrump movement will do just what cucks do: fall in line behind the Alpha male. They are having their little hissy fit, but they are unprincipled little whores every one of them, and they know who is going to butter their bread from now on.

    The Republicucks are just Democrats who can’t make it in the Dem world — too much competition from canny Jews and rising Asians and the gay/lesbian crowd. So instead, they find easier sledding by pretending to be Republicans. Seriously, what do you suppose is harder? Getting at gig at National Review or The Atlantic or New York Times?

    The nevertrumps are looooosers.

  7. Seriously, what do you suppose is harder? Getting at gig at National Review or The Atlantic or New York Times?

    Who cares? That’s either mumps or measles or dysentery.

    They are having their little hissy fit, but they are unprincipled little whores every one of them, and they know who is going to butter their bread from now on.

    Well said. Once it sinks into their dense little pea-brains that the conservative electorate itself has had an epiphany they will tuck tail and fall right into the rear of the column, with Trump marching forward at the head.

  8. — The Republicucks are just Democrats who can’t make it in the Dem world — too much competition from canny Jews and rising Asians and the gay/lesbian crowd. So instead, they find easier sledding by pretending to be Republicans.

    Good point. Never saw it put that way.

    PS: twitter cunts suspended Laguna Beach Fogey’s account @kaliyugasurf. It’s been on my daily visits list.

  9. It’s crazy to think that Bush Republicanism was so bad that it could push two completely different Presidents into office in reaction – Bush and Obama.

  10. I have predicted a Trump landslide (59% of the popular vote) for months now, in talking with my father and analyzing all the factors. I may post my mental workout on my website
    (sorcerygod.wordpress.com). Here are a few of my points in brief:

    * Liberal Fatigue. The American public only has a limited ability to swallow the liberal programs they are force-fed. There has already been 8 years of a black president. A woman president on top of that is too big of an ask. The liberals know this, but are hoping for another win of the roulette table. Knowing they have the media on their side (90+% hard-left liberal), they believed it’s quite plausible. So Trump has the advantage there.

    * The old bag Clinton has no charisma. Although she has all the baggage and reputation of a politician, she is the WIFE of a politician (justly legendary Bill Clinton, schmoozer extraordinaire), not a social charmer herself. Donald Trump has at least a degree of charisma. Advantage Trump.

    There are many other factors that go into play. But the biggest one is this:

    * Seen side by side, Trump versus Clinton, on the television, he will look YUUUGELY great, and she will look sallow and weak and somewhat repulsive, even to liberals. The more the direct contrast is made, the more he wins. Advantage, Trump.

    Plus, he’s entertaining — bonus icing on the cake for a public that wants fun news from its executive office for 4 (or 8) years. I expect to see Trump in office until 2024.

    — $orcerygod

  11. Sorcery God your site needs some work, man. Less childish arrogance would be a good start.

  12. We need to show up at the homes and offices of #NeverTrump traitors and execute some payback. I’m pretty open about it. They think we’ll forget…Fools!

  13. We need to show up at the homes and offices of #NeverTrump traitors and execute some payback. I’m pretty open about it. They think we’ll forget…Fools!

    Nah, that’s just politics. As long as they fall in line with Trump now it will be fine, none the worse and probably helps Trump’s image as a “new” Republican breaking away from stale, self-annihilating Bush Republicanism. For instance, Bobby Jindal started as a nevertrumper but is now making these funny awkward overtures on social media about how the GOP should unite and support Trump but, so what – we will take it, especially considering that Cruz won nearby Texas and Oklahoma. (not that either is any danger to go blue in the national election, but still)

    The payback you mentioned should be reserved for the worst of the stalwart cuck holdouts who are most vocal about it after June. That’s probably going to be most of the National Review. I think even the grand loser Cucks Romney and McCain will attempt to simply keep their mouth shut and their opposition out of the public eye, which is fine by me. GOP chairman Reince Preibus has already started to spread the word to get in line and get quiet behind Trump.

    Either way, the GOP should exile Romney to outer darkness, never to return. His toxic loserness radiates in all directions and infects any GOP candidates that resemble him.

  14. “Either way, the GOP should exile Romney to outer darkness, never to return. His toxic loserness radiates in all directions and infects any GOP candidates that resemble him.”

    Man, I remember at 28sherman and even at GLP before that calling out Romney, describing him a opportunist and bumbler and a tongue-tied fool, etc., and you guys under the direction of SOBL just tore into me, saying I was crazy and went on about what a wonderful alpha and businessman Mitt was.

    Ahh, sweet vindication!

  15. and you guys under the direction of SOBL just tore into me, saying I was crazy and went on about what a wonderful alpha and businessman Mitt was.

    Ahh, sweet vindication!

    Well, I never use the “alpha” term so that part wasnt me… but I do vaguely remember you being very critical of Romney, so I shoulda listened to you then.

  16. and the latest one was a story of Oprah Winfrey (true dat)

    I’ve always felt that something is a little off about Canadians but chocolate chubby chaser fetishism probably won’t garner you too many followers at alt right sites like this one. Good luck, though.

  17. “I do vaguely remember you being very critical of Romney, “

    Problem with Romney the archetype is common: his scionism sort-of alienates him from the very subjects he’s to serve and needs to be in tune with. He started out to high on Maslow’s pyramid, so he’s got this sort-of vague, thoughtfully constructed melancholy that he’s worked into convincing himself is a life’s ambition.

    But at the end of the day, he’s bored with nut-n-bolts process of campaigning and serving while in office; he’s only true id and psychological aspiration is to sate the urge to ‘one-up Dad.’ I mean, how could it not be?

    This sounds like a vague gripe but it’s a real common dilemma, though it’s hard to by outright sympathetic towards someone whose fate is a conundrum from a poverty of abundance, no?

  18. Problem with Romney the archetype is common: his scionism sort-of alienates him from the very subjects he’s to serve and needs to be in tune with. He started out to high on Maslow’s pyramid, so he’s got this sort-of vague, thoughtfully constructed melancholy that he’s worked into convincing himself is a life’s ambition.

    Yeah, there’s something different, weird (and distant) about Romney’s public persona that causes a strange vibe to emanate away from him. You’ve described it about as well as I’ve seen. Somehow the also filthy rich Trump avoids coming off the same way, maybe just by his very un-patrician-like habit of yapping so much.

  19. Interesting piece about Trump in the Jew Yorker. (Behind paywall… cut and pasted below)

    The author acknowledges that Trump’s appeal to aggreived white working class voters is responsible for his victory in the primary elections. He goes as far to acknowledge that these grievances are legitimate, but then puts forth the prima facie argument that white identity politics are “dangerous” and that Trump “plays to their sense of entitlement.”

    Excuse me, but what is entitled about advocating for your own interests, especially when EVERY OTHER ETHNIC GROUP does the same? What is inherently dangerous about white identity politics? He doesn’t even bother make an argument against it; he just puts it out there as self-evident fact. This is where the intellectual laziness of the liberals gets them into a bind. They have enjoyed megaphone for so long that they assume no one questions the cultural marxist presumptions that have been perpetuated in their cloistered intellectual circles, and then out of nowhere comes this boorish “proto-fascist” who calls their bluff! How dare those flyover rubes question OUR enlightened version of identity politics!

    —————

    Last week, Donald Trump became the leader of the Republican Party. He thrashed his way to this summit by understanding what many intelligent people utterly failed to see: the decline of American institutions and mores, from Wall Street and the Senate to cable news and the Twitterverse, made the candidacy of a celebrity proto-fascist with no impulse control not just possible but in some ways inevitable. It shouldn’t have been such a surprise. An early tremor came in 2008, in the person of Sarah Palin, who endorsed Trump before almost any other top Republican. In her contempt for qualifications, her blithe ignorance, she was an avatar for Trump. A lot of Republicans, many of them female, saw in the small-town common woman an image of themselves; many men see in the say-anything billionaire an image of their aspirations. Palin showboated her way from politics to reality TV, while Trump swaggered in the opposite direction. Together, they wore a path that is already almost normal.

    Trump also grasped what Republican élites are still struggling to fathom: the ideology that has gripped their Party since the late nineteen-seventies—anti-government, pro-business, nominally pious—has little appeal for millions of ordinary Republicans. The base of the Party, the middle-aged white working class, has suffered at least as much as any demographic group because of globalization, low-wage immigrant labor, and free trade. Trump sensed the rage that flared from this pain and made it the fuel of his campaign. Conservative orthodoxy, already weakened by its own extremism—the latest, least appealing standard-bearer was Ted Cruz—has suffered a stunning defeat from within. And Trump has replaced it with something more dangerous: white identity politics.

    Republican Presidential candidates received majorities of the white vote in every election after 1964. In 2012, Barack Obama won about forty per cent of it, average for Democrats in the past half century. But no Republican candidate—not even Richard Nixon or Ronald Reagan—made as specific an appeal to the economic anxieties and social resentments of white Americans as Trump has. When he vows to “make America great again,” he is talking about and to white America, especially the less well off. The ugliness of the pitch will drive some more moderate and perhaps more affluent Republicans to sit out the fall election, or even to vote for Hillary Clinton, the nearly certain Democratic nominee. #NeverTrump and #ImWithHer are trending on select Republican Twitter feeds. Trump’s toxicity, combined with a decline in the white electorate—which, since 1976, has dropped from eighty-nine per cent of the American voting public to seventy-two per cent—might make this a year of Democratic routs.

    The Democratic Party has a strange relationship with the white working class. Bernie Sanders speaks to and for it—not as being white but as being economically victimized. He kept his campaign alive last week, in Indiana, in large part by beating Clinton nearly two to one among whites without a college degree. Coverage of Sanders has focussed on his support among the young and the progressive, but he has also outperformed Clinton with the white working class. Even in losing, Sanders has shown that a candidacy based on economic populism can win back some voters who long ago deserted the Democratic Party. It’s hard to know whether these voters, faced with a choice between Clinton and Trump, will revert to the Republican side, stay home, or vote for a Democrat who until now hasn’t known how to reach them.

    Identity politics, of a different brand from Trump’s, is also gaining strength among progressives. In some cases, it comes with an aversion toward, even contempt for, their fellow-Americans who are white and sinking. Abstract sympathy with the working class as an economic entity is easy, but the feeling can vanish on contact with actual members of the group, who often arrive with disturbing beliefs and powerful resentments—who might not sound or look like people urban progressives want to know. White male privilege remains alive in America, but the phrase would seem odd, if not infuriating, to a sixty-year-old man working as a Walmart greeter in southern Ohio. The growing strain of identity politics on the left is pushing working-class whites, chastised for various types of bigotry (and sometimes justifiably), all the more decisively toward Trump.

    Last fall, two Princeton economists released a study showing that, since the turn of the century, middle-aged white Americans—primarily less educated ones—have been dying at ever-increasing rates. This is true of no other age or ethnic group in the United States. The main factors are alcohol, opioids, and suicide—an epidemic of despair. A subsequent Washington Post story showed that the crisis is particularly severe among middle-aged white women in rural areas. In twenty-one counties across the South and the Midwest, mortality rates among these women have actually doubled since the turn of the century. Anne Case, one of the Princeton study’s co-authors, said, “They may be privileged by the color of their skin, but that is the only way in their lives they’ve ever been privileged.”

    According to the Post, these regions of white working-class pain tend to be areas where Trump enjoys strong support. These Americans know that they’re being left behind, by the economy and by the culture. They sense the indifference or disdain of the winners on the prosperous coasts and in the innovative cities, and it is reciprocated. Trump has seized the Republican nomination by finding scapegoats for the economic hardships and disintegrating lives of working-class whites, while giving these voters a reassuring but false promise of their restoration to the center of American life. He plays to their sense of entitlement, but his hollowness will ultimately deepen their cynicism.

    The Democrats probably won’t need the votes of the white working class to win this year. Demographic trends favor the Party, as does the bloated and hateful persona of the Republican choice. Nonetheless, the Democratic nominee can’t afford, either politically or morally, to write off those Americans. They need a politics that offers honest answers to their legitimate grievances and keeps them from sliding further into self-destruction.

    —George Packer (probably not a Jew)

  20. “They need a politics that offers honest answers to their legitimate grievances and keeps them from sliding further into self-destruction.”

    That is a to-the-point concluding sentence.

    But to get all meta … politics cannot address that sort of problem. Politics cannot address the lack of meaning in people’s lives.

    Catch-22, whatever. “There’s no political solution.”

    Ultimately people are constrained, by their animal and biological nature: and politics offers a chimeral deal: a false solution.

    ********************

    We are not going to evolve into anything beyond suffering monkeys. Enjoy yourself, be the best monkey you can.

    Oh what? you think we’re going to the stars. We fucked up this planet so let’s go somewhere else?

  21. “They [the Democratic nominee] need a politics that offers honest answers to their legitimate grievances and keeps them from sliding further into self-destruction.”

    That is a to-the-point concluding sentence.

    Crooked Hillary has demonstrated that she is more interested in shilling for Llyod Blankfein and sending Americans to the middle east to fight neocon wars on behalf of Israel.

    We are not going to evolve into anything beyond suffering monkeys. Enjoy yourself, be the best monkey you can.

    I don’t share you pessimism but I think it’s in interesting philosophy. You might be interested in the book “Conspiracy Against The Human Race” by Ligotti.

    https://www.amazon.com/Conspiracy-against-Human-Race-Contrivance-ebook/dp/B008EENBZU?ie=UTF8&btkr=1&redirect=true&ref_=dp-kindle-redirect

    His philosophy was the basis of the character Rust Chole in season 1 of True Detective, which I highly recommend. You kinda remind me of him.

  22. There is kind of a Texas theme going on.

    I went through there as a child, but not as an adult.

    I read somewhere about their ‘fighting stance’. You sit shoulder to shoulder at the bar, don’t be ‘facing off’ people. Cormac wrote about that pretty well.

    Next thing you know, someone is insulted …

    “Words were spoken which couldn’t be taken back.”

    *********************

    Is it still like that now, or is it just more gay suburbia?

  23. CNN reporting that Matt Romney is officially dropping his #NeverTrump campaigning:

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/05/18/politics/mitt-romney-never-trump-independent-2016-campaign/index.html

    A quote from RNC chairman Reince Priebus on Sunday:

    “They can try to hijack another party and get on the ballot, but, look, it’s a suicide mission for our country because what it means is that you’re throwing down not just eight years of the White House but potentially 100 years on the Supreme Court and wrecking this country for many generations,” Priebus said on “Fox News Sunday,” anticipating that a conservative third-party candidate would split the Republican vote and ensure a Democrat wins the White House.

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