The Most Anti-Human Song Ever Written

imagine2

The anti-humanity of John Lennon’s song “Imagine” lies in the bleak nihilism of ending conflict by destroying everything that anyone has ever cared about.

And that’s what 500 corporate logos would have you do. Stop loving the things you care about and hating those that would harm them. No space to secure a future for your child. Stop reaching for transcendence or thinking about the destination of your soul. Stop dreaming. They gave you Miley Cyrus’s twerking ass. Meat hangs on hooks. Peace.

(The above graphic was created by me.)

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26 thoughts on “The Most Anti-Human Song Ever Written

  1. PA…

    What’s truly more particular AT THIS STAGE of the game?

    A German?

    An American?

    A Jew?

    A homo?

    A dyke?

    A jihadist?

    A colored?

    A migger?

    A “white” liberal?

    A…. White Supremacist?

    All these years later… What are you? Still just European ethnic in his own hidden war against white Supremacy?

  2. Lennon and his generation didn’t want to go to Viet Nam and kill the Yellow Man, instead they wanted to go the park and get high.

    Were they right, were they wrong? It is clearly a consideration that cannot be removed from its context, which was the second half of the last century.

    White people did not use their energy, uh, very responsibly. Pretty ironic for a people who consider themselves forward thinking. We got our hands on the oil, and created “modern civilization” yay.

    But those guys then saw the world that had been created with all the easy energy and technology, and they didn’t see it as a miracle or a marvel, they saw it as “square” – and it was literally square, the street plans and the houses and buildings and the framework of people’s thoughts.

    This is a video of Lennon in Central Park, it must have been shortly before he was killed.

    Considering his larger-than-life affect, and effect on other people, both as evidenced in the video footage, calling him a nihilist is quite simply wrong.

  3. The anti-humanity of John Lennon’s song “Imagine” lies in the bleak nihilism of ending conflict by destroying everything that anyone has ever cared about.

    Re-reading the original post, i see that Lennon himself is not called a nihilist; but rather a song is characterized as such.

    Whether that distiction matters or not. No one can be known for anything other than what they have done.

  4. Elk, good insights as usual, esp. tying in Nam. Yeah, my commentary is on the song itself, in particular the reverent regard it’s held in today.

    The song is otherwise very lovely musically. Imagine if our talent hadn’t been directed by death cultists over the past decades.

  5. “This is a video of Lennon in Central Park, it must have been shortly before he was killed.”
    FWIW, the song, vid and album came out in late ’74, about six years before he was killed.

  6. I wish i was in Central Park, then.

    God times have changed, become so mean and cruel.

    We have to go kill everyone, what a drag.

  7. Slightly O.T.

    after watching that ‘mind games’ vid, i ventured through a few of the other vids on that page in the youtube queue and indulged a few clips capturing the mood during ‘Beatlemania’ in the mid 60s. Suffice to say, it’s amazing to see still how surreal such a phenomenon was and how utterly impossible such mass fascination would be today in this hopelessly fragmented and atomized world we live in, talk about massly shared white identity and consciousness; i would dare to say that the beatlemania was the last time there was such a passionate and widely shared white consensus in america and europe.

    Perhaps therein lies the caucasian salvation: replicate the mood and passion of Beatlemania in some 21st-century form!

  8. nikcrit…

    I would say it was the last euphoric collective gasp before the conscious decision to racially self-annihilate…

  9. I wonder how different he would be or think if he were alive today. Most of those ppl preaching indifference to societal consequences, likes the one we see today, live isolated from. Most ppl today are not taught how to be responsible of their own actions.

  10. Apparently, Lennon was distancing himself from his nihilistic (what his fans called “idealistic”) image toward the end of his life. A lot of interesting quotes attributed to him in this article, which reject many of the lines in “Imagine”:

    http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/stop-imagining/

    There was something of a genuine artist in him, a receptivity to a higher reality that we don’t understand but feel it when it’s transubstantiated into words and melodies. Beatles-era, ‘Across the Universe” is sublime. I like much of his solo work.

    The passive nature of the artist is a double-edged sword. It lets him pick up on a transcendent reality but also makes him vulnerable to exploitation by handlers with an agenda.

  11. Lennon’s best lyric:

    As soon as you’re born they make you feel small
    By giving you no time instead of it all
    Till the pain is so big you feel nothing at all
    A working class hero is something to be
    A working class hero is something to be

    They hurt you at home and they hit you at school
    They hate you if you’re clever and they despise a fool
    Till you’re so fucking crazy you can’t follow their rules
    A working class hero is something to be
    A working class hero is something to be

    When they’ve tortured and scared you for twenty-odd years
    Then they expect you to pick a career
    When you can’t really function you’re so full of fear
    A working class hero is something to be
    A working class hero is something to be

    Keep you doped with religion and sex and TV
    And you think you’re so clever and classless and free
    But you’re still fucking peasants as far as I can see
    A working class hero is something to be
    A working class hero is something to be

    There’s room at the top they’re telling you still
    But first you must learn how to smile as you kill
    If you want to be like the folks on the hill

    A working class hero is something to be
    A working class hero is something to be
    If you want to be a hero well just follow me
    If you want to be a hero well just follow me

  12. A very good song. And Green Day nails it musically.

    The lyrics are just one step short of greatness though. I’ll have to think a bit more about this, but the song feels like a con to me. Like somebody luring you when you’re at your weakest.

  13. Working Class Hero, that is a very dark song. It gives an impression of England. Who can imagine having to slave away in a coal mine. Do people still have to do that?

    I think that song is mostly about two chords, A-minor and G, maybe. And yet it is elusive, the necessary depth of feeling and “ontological scope” and also the psychic constitution of being so familiar with feelings of loneliness and despair to convey something worthwhile like acceptance and balance.

    They hate you if you’re clever and they despise the fool

    So true. The Part of the Fool in an interesting one. It’s deceptive, in a way, i suppose.

    I always heard this line as follows,

    Keep your dope with religion and sex and tv

  14. is this now a music thread?
    if so, then i won’t be off-topic by adding that Plastic Ono Band, the album that ‘working class hero’ is on and Lennon’s first solo album, is IMHO the best solo Beatles project ever, hands down; very personal, primal and therapeutic album for its creator; lot of psychic energy, pain and catharsis balanced by simple and sparse yet powerful music production.

    here’s my favorite song from that album:

  15. That was not off topic at all. I don’t mind O/T comments, especially from old timers/regulars if they are natural thought tangents.

  16. Nik: “Plastic Ono Band” is the best Beatles solo effort by general consensus I would think. Lennon was clearly the best Beatle in the solo era. He had his duds — “Mind Games” is a weak album — but even up to the end he was putting out great stuff, like “Double Fantasy.”

    Back to “Working Class Hero,” I find PA’s remark interesting: “but the song feels like a con to me. Like somebody luring you when you’re at your weakest.”

    It IS something of a con, because I’m not sure we can tell just how Lennon is playing it. Obviously, by that point he was a very rich “working-class hero.” That’s always been a hard transition for rock stars to make — Springsteen never really was as good after getting wildly rich and famous.

    The song drips with contempt for its subject, but it also has empathy. So what’s that all about? It Lennon just spitting out the standard Liberal contempt for the working class that hasn’t decided to join the revolution yet (hence “peasants”)? Or is he showing some real insight into a government system of disenfranchisement that even by 1970 was making itself felt? Keep in mind, this is long before immigration and Britain in 1970 is a virtually all white nation and the only minority in the US is blacks. Yet the song probably speaks more to working class whites today then it did then.

  17. The song drips with contempt for its subject, but it also has empathy. So what’s that all about? It Lennon just spitting out the standard Liberal contempt for the working class that hasn’t decided to join the revolution yet (hence “peasants”)? Or is he showing some real insight into a government system of disenfranchisement that even by 1970 was making itself felt?

    I’d have to say ‘neither’ re. the above. But that opinion comes from the benefit of having read Lennon’s thoughts about that specific song, which he proposed was a figment figure ‘ideal’ to contrast with his cultural-icon celebrity; e.g., this was right after the breakup of the Beatles, and at that point he was making a literal press conference tour in which he was berate his former band and status. He was very self-deprecating and anti-celebrity during that period and acting-out those sentiments in his songs and interviews.

    Here’s some of Lennon’s thoughts about the song:

    http://www.songfacts.com/detail.php?id=2885

  18. Lennon’s brilliance in that song is that it can’t be interpreted. That’s the whole thing, that he leaves the critics flailing.

    Or that it can be interpreted, … however you want.

    Apparently Lennon was a first-class jerk, a real asshole. He was a cluster-b, and with a high schizotypic index? I don’t actually know, what schizotypic means, except for that it is an important concept with heavy hitting explanatory power.

    Schizotypic means that a person’s conception of himself, in regard to other people, has become too vague. There is your definition.

    That is sort of O/T but it is relevant because what is up for debate, a Larger Theme, is ethnogenesis and the social roles that people can play.

    And probably Lennon was not cluster-b, because look at his success.

  19. Thanks Nik for the Song Facts site. But OH MY GOD what a time suck that threatens to be. It’s like a completely snackable web site. I had to close it right away before I got sucked in forever. Lord knows if I ever hit the Dylan section I’ll never get out.

  20. “Apparently Lennon was a first-class jerk,”

    I have read similar things, including beating Yoko and there is his callous abandonment of his first son Julian (about which Paul McCartney wrote Hey Jude to cheer him up.)

  21. “Apparently Lennon was a first-class jerk,”

    I think anybody thrown into such surreal circumstance and stature would be what us humdrum mortals would consider to be a jerk, asshole, egomaniac, fill-in-the-blank, etc., ad infinitum……I mean, for whatever reason, i happened to have been reconsidering a lot of pop music after not thinking much about it for a few years……. just refresh your memories for a moment by looking at a few of those Beatlemania mob scenes from ’64-’65 and imagine if yourself had experienced something like that while in your impressionable early 20s. I sometimes feel it’s odd and damn-near miraculous that some of those figures aren’t even more oddly self-consumed than they are.
    The concept of fame and the human psyche, including its capacity for alienation and social ostracization, is a interesting topic and one whose important dimensions happen to be relatively recent and contemporary phenomena, because we’re talking about technological fame paraphenilia that didn’t for the most part exist beyond 100 or so years ago.

    FWIW, this essay, ostensibly a review of the tell-all biography of Lennon by the notorious Albert Goldman, is one of the more thoughtful midbrow mag pieces i’ve read on the particulars of modern pop fame ——- a subject that’s been written about often but whose critiques are just as often rife with horrible cliches.

    https://newrepublic.com/article/69228/lives-the-saints

  22. That is a good link, nikcrit, and a long article.

    The thing about the Beatles, and about popular music in general, that makes it always and ever a topic, is that elusive factor of “anonymous genius”.

    For instance in that article there is a certain reverence to the press as worthwhile gatekeepers of cultural value. That is one of the themes, and how the Beatles busted through that.

    On the personal it is somewhat embarrassing – ember-assing, as the fags might say – to have to talk about the Beatles and the rest of that 60s scene, for guideposts and meaning, about what we have in common. But the reality is that that is it. That is what we have in common. There was still a sweet spot in that cultural scene – ooooh aaaaah it felt so good! and it didn’t last long. Hey that reminds me of something, …

    But you can’t control for genius and inspiration. That is the nature of it, that it can’t be controlled for. Lennon is that man. He is a “genius” in the artistic sense of personhood. This is a concept that i think is lacking in this here our Wasteland of contemporary culture, but that we might be able to borrow and steal from our romantic misconceptions of the Tomahawk Featherhead Indians (Great Lakes Region) – that a man was worthwhile in the most important sense for no other reason than that he was true to his People. He didn’t make a lot of money, he didn’t necessarily push forward technological progress of culture, … but he was always around. He was.

    That is what we are missing, and someone like Lennon comes along, and he has that great name, that great anonymous background. From the link,

    In England they played for working-class kids and Teddy boys their own age; in Germany, they played for drunken sailors and offduty prostitutes. They did not regard these experiences as dues to be paid on the road to respectability, but as the natural thing to be doing. This was the world of rock ‘n’ roll they knew. It was their culture.

    I would emphasize how they did not regard doing those things as a path to respectability, but simply what they did because they were gritty tough kids. There is something about my age, my peers, that is the exact opposite. We don’t do those things because that is who we are, we do them because it’s part of a checklist. I am veering off into TMI, but the point remains, that we’re not part of something, and that we have to create it.

  23. Pingback: Pope Francis “Squres” the Circle – PA

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